Calendar

Apr
30
Mon
PDS Atmospheres Node meeting
Apr 30 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
May
3
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy
May 3 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
May
4
Fri
Galaxy Group Meeting
May 4 @ 12:30 pm – 1:00 pm
May
9
Wed
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Caitlin Doughty
May 9 @ 2:15 pm – 3:15 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Caitlin Doughty @ Science Hall 107

Metal Absorption in the Circumgalactic Medium During the Epoch of Reionization

Caitlin Doughty, NMSU

The characteristics of metal absorption arising from the circumgalactic medium of galaxies have been demonstrated to be related to conditions in the galaxy which sourced them, as well as to the ambient ultraviolet background. I propose a three- pronged thesis in order to better understand and utilize these relationships. First, I will explore whether the spectral energy distributions of binary stars, incorporated into a custom version of GADGET-3, can explain the discrepancy between observed and simulated absorber statistics. Second, I will study the relationship between neu- tral oxygen absorbers and the neutral hydrogen fraction in simulated quasar sight- lines and relate the results to observations of neutral oxygen at z ≥ 4.0. Third, I will study the relationships between the emissive properties of galaxies, stemming from their nebular gas, and the metal absorbers which they source. Taken as a whole, this thesis will improve the ability of cosmological simulations to reproduce realistic metal absorption, probe the local progress and topology of reionization, and under- stand what emissive galaxy traits we expect at z > 5 based on observations of metal absorbers.

May
11
Fri
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Kathryn Steakley
May 11 @ 2:15 pm – 3:30 pm
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Kathryn Steakley @ BX102

Impact heating of the early Martian climate

Kathryn Steakley, NMSU Astronomy

The nature of Mars’ ancient climate has been the subject of debate for decades. Abundant geologic evidence suggests that liquid water flowed on the surface of Mars during the late Noachian and early Hesperian eras (~3.5 – 3.8 billion years ago), but climate models struggle to reproduce such warm and wet conditions. Characterizing the climate that supported this aqueous activity and constraining the duration and intensity of warm and wet periods is crucial to understanding whether Mars was habitable in the past. 1-D climate modeling studies suggest that asteroid impacts are capable of inducing greenhouse warming on early Mars due to the substantial amounts of energy and water that are injected into the atmosphere (Segura et al., 2008). We use a 3-D global climate model (GCM) to simulate the post-impact climate conditions presented in Segura et al. (2008) (30-, 50-, and 100-km impactors in 150 mbar, 1 bar, and 2 bar atmospheres) and examine the resulting global distributions of surface temperatures and precipitation to assess whether these post-impact climates can facilitate valley network formation in Mars’ southern highlands. We find that these post-impact scenarios do result in above-freezing temperatures and 10s of cm of rainfall in the southern highlands, but that ultimately these warm and wet periods are short lived (on the order of years) and do not support the sustained warm and wet conditions that facilitate valley network formation. We find that scenarios with high surface pressures and scenarios with radiatively active clouds experience longer periods of above-freezing temperatures and result in higher final mean annual temperatures (up to 272.8K in our warmest scenario). In future work, we will investigate other greenhouse gases delivered by impacts in addition to water, including hydrogen and/or methane, to test whether this prolongs the warm and wet periods following impacts.

Aug
24
Fri
Colloquium: Dawn Gelino (Host: Tom Harrison)
Aug 24 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Dawn Gelino (Host: Tom Harrison) @ BX102

NASA, Exoplanets, and Life After NMSU

Dawn Gelino, NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, CalTech

Abstract:  Are you interested in learning more about the search for life in the Universe? Or perhaps you may be interested in being awarded time on 10 m telescopes for your science? Or maybe you are ready to learn more about prestigious NASA Postdoctoral Fellowships? This talk will touch on some recent and exciting results in the exoplanet field, as well as the different NASA HQ programs that I currently run for all of astrophysics (many of which may be helpful and applicable to YOU), and the path I took from NMSU to where I am now.

Aug
27
Mon
Planetary Group meeting
Aug 27 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Aug
31
Fri
Colloquium: Don Terndrup (Host: Nancy Chanover)
Aug 31 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Don Terndrup (Host: Nancy Chanover) @ BX102

Stellar Winds and Stellar Rotation

Don Terndrup, Ohio State University

For more than 50 years, we have known that stars rotate quickly when they are young and slow down as they age.  This process gives us important clues about magnetic field strength and geometry, as well as the nature of stellar winds, in solar-like stars.  We have been working to put the analysis of stellar rotation on a modern statistical footing, and in this talk I will give you an update on our efforts.  There are a number of critical observational problems that must be considered in calibrating models of angular momentum loss, especially problems of data censorship (older or less active stars are not detected in studies of rotation).  I will conclude by evaluating the prospects for using stellar rotation as an age indicator, and demonstrate that such ages are far less precise – though still useful – than our group and others have previously claimed.

 

 

Sep
5
Wed
Galaxy Group meeting
Sep 5 @ 2:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Sep
10
Mon
Planetary Group meeting
Sep 10 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm