Calendar

Mar
29
Thu
Colloquium (Joint with Physics): Jim Fuller (Host: Ethan Dederick)
Mar 29 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Colloquium (Joint with Physics): Jim Fuller (Host: Ethan Dederick) @ Gardiner Hall 230

Surprising Impacts of Gravity Waves

Jim Fuller, Caltech

Gravity waves are low frequency fluid oscillations restored by buoyancy forces in planetary and stellar interiors. Despite their ubiquity, the importance of gravity waves in evolutionary processes and asteroseismology has only recently been appreciated. For instance, Kepler asteroseismic data has revealed gravity modes in thousands of red giant stars, providing unprecedented measurements of core structure and rotation. I will show how gravity modes (or lack thereof) can also reveal strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giants, and I will demonstrate that strong fields appear to be common within “retired” A stars but are absent in their lower-mass counterparts. In the late phase evolution of massive stars approaching core-collapse, vigorous convection excites gravity waves that can redistribute huge amounts of energy within the star. I will present preliminary models of this process, showing how wave energy redistribution can drive outbursts and enhanced mass loss in the final years of massive star evolution, with important consequences for the appearance of subsequent supernovae.
Apr
22
Mon
Pizza lunch: Sarah Kovac/David DeColibus
Apr 22 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Sarah Kovac/David DeColibus @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Apr
29
Mon
Pizza lunch: Kristen Luchsinger
Apr 29 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Kristen Luchsinger @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Sep
13
Fri
Colloquium: Eric Nielsen (Host: Moire Prescott)
Sep 13 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Eric Nielsen (Host: Moire Prescott) @ BX102

Charting the Outer Reaches of Exoplanetary Systems: Wide-Separation Giant Planet Demographics with Direct Imaging

Eric Nielsen, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University

Over the past decade, the combination of advances in adaptive optics, coronagraphy, and data processing has enabled the direct detection and characterization of giant exoplanets orbiting young, nearby stars. In addition to the wealth of information about exoplanetary atmospheres we obtain from spectroscopy of directly imaged planets, the demographics of these wide-separation planets allow us to directly test theories of planet formation, probing the outer planetary systems compared to transit and radial velocity techniques. In this talk I will present results from the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey (GPIES), which surveyed 521 nearby stars for giant planet and brown dwarf companions orbiting beyond 5 AU, and is one of the largest, deepest direct imaging searches for exoplanets every conducted. The overall occurrence rate of substellar companions, and trends with companion mass, semi-major axis, and stellar mass are consistent with giant planets forming via core accretion, and point to different formation mechanisms for giant planets and brown dwarfs between 10 and 100 AU.

 

Dec
2
Mon
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Farhan and Oana)
Dec 2 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Farhan and Oana) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Farhan Hasan and Oana Vesa

Dec
4
Wed
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Ali and Matt)
Dec 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Ali and Matt) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Ali Hyder and Matt Varakian

Dec
9
Mon
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Minje)
Dec 9 @ 12:30 pm – 1:15 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Minje) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Minje Boem