Calendar

Sep
1
Fri
Colloquium: Isak Wold (Host: Moire Prescott)
Sep 1 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Isak Wold (Host: Moire Prescott) @ BX102

A Faint Flux-Limited LAE Sample at z = 0.3

Isak Wold, UT Austin

Observational surveys of Lya emitters (LAEs) have proven to be an efficient method to identify and study large numbers of galaxies over a wide redshift range. To understand what types of galaxies are selected in LAE surveys – and how this evolves with redshift – it is important to establish a low-redshift reference sample that can be directly compared to high-redshift samples.  The lowest redshift where a direct Lya survey is currently possible is at a redshift of z~0.3 via the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX ) FUV grism data. Using the z~0.3 GALEX sample as an anchor point, it has been suggested that at low redshifts high equivalent width (EW) LAEs become less prevalent and that the amount of escaping Lya emission declines rapidly.  A number of explanations for these trends have been suggested including increasing dust content, increasing neutral column density, and/or increasing metallicity of star-forming galaxies at lower redshifts. However, the published z~0.3 GALEX sample is pre-selected from bright NUV objects.  Thus, objects with strong Lya emission but faint continuum (high-EW LAEs) could be missed.  In this talk, I will present my efforts to re-reduce the deepest archival GALEX FUV grism data and obtain a sample that is not biased against high-EW LAEs.  I will discuss the implications of this new sample on the evolutionary trends listed above.

Sep
8
Fri
Colloquium: Travis Metcalfe (Host: Jason Jackiewicz)
Sep 8 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Travis Metcalfe (Host: Jason Jackiewicz) @ BX102

The Magnetic Mid-life Crisis of the Sun

Dr. Travis Metcalfe, Space Sciences Institute

After decades of effort, the solar activity cycle is exceptionally well characterized but it remains poorly understood. Pioneering work at the Mount Wilson Observatory demonstrated that other sun-like stars also show regular activity cycles, and suggested two possible relationships between the rotation rate and the length of the cycle. Neither of these relationships correctly describe the properties of the Sun, a peculiarity that demands explanation. Recent discoveries have started to shed light on this issue, suggesting that the Sun’s rotation rate and magnetic field are currently in a transitional phase that occurs in all middle-aged stars. We have recently identified the manifestation of this magnetic transition in the best available data on stellar cycles. The results suggest that the solar cycle may be growing longer on stellar evolutionary timescales, and that the cycle might disappear sometime in the next 0.8-2.4 Gyr. Future tests of this hypothesis will come from ground-based activity monitoring of Kepler targets that span the magnetic transition, and from asteroseismology with the TESS mission to determine precise masses and ages for bright stars with known cycles.

Aug
16
Thu
ASTR 620 – Planetary Processes
Aug 16 @ 8:55 am – 10:10 am
Aug
21
Tue
ASTR 620 – Planetary Processes
Aug 21 @ 8:55 am – 10:10 am
Aug
23
Thu
ASTR 620 – Planetary Processes
Aug 23 @ 8:55 am – 10:10 am
Aug
24
Fri
Colloquium: Dawn Gelino (Host: Tom Harrison)
Aug 24 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Dawn Gelino (Host: Tom Harrison) @ BX102

NASA, Exoplanets, and Life After NMSU

Dawn Gelino, NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, CalTech

Abstract:  Are you interested in learning more about the search for life in the Universe? Or perhaps you may be interested in being awarded time on 10 m telescopes for your science? Or maybe you are ready to learn more about prestigious NASA Postdoctoral Fellowships? This talk will touch on some recent and exciting results in the exoplanet field, as well as the different NASA HQ programs that I currently run for all of astrophysics (many of which may be helpful and applicable to YOU), and the path I took from NMSU to where I am now.

Aug
27
Mon
Planetary Group meeting
Aug 27 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Aug
28
Tue
ASTR 620 – Planetary Processes
Aug 28 @ 8:55 am – 10:10 am
Aug
30
Thu
ASTR 620 – Planetary Processes
Aug 30 @ 8:55 am – 10:10 am
Aug
31
Fri
Colloquium: Don Terndrup (Host: Nancy Chanover)
Aug 31 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Don Terndrup (Host: Nancy Chanover) @ BX102

Stellar Winds and Stellar Rotation

Don Terndrup, Ohio State University

For more than 50 years, we have known that stars rotate quickly when they are young and slow down as they age.  This process gives us important clues about magnetic field strength and geometry, as well as the nature of stellar winds, in solar-like stars.  We have been working to put the analysis of stellar rotation on a modern statistical footing, and in this talk I will give you an update on our efforts.  There are a number of critical observational problems that must be considered in calibrating models of angular momentum loss, especially problems of data censorship (older or less active stars are not detected in studies of rotation).  I will conclude by evaluating the prospects for using stellar rotation as an age indicator, and demonstrate that such ages are far less precise – though still useful – than our group and others have previously claimed.