Calendar

Apr
24
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Laurel Farris
Apr 24 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Laurel Farris @ AY 119

Determining the size of coronal bright points using cross-correlation methods

Laurel Farris

 

Sep
1
Fri
Colloquium: Isak Wold (Host: Moire Prescott)
Sep 1 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Isak Wold (Host: Moire Prescott) @ BX102

A Faint Flux-Limited LAE Sample at z = 0.3

Isak Wold, UT Austin

Observational surveys of Lya emitters (LAEs) have proven to be an efficient method to identify and study large numbers of galaxies over a wide redshift range. To understand what types of galaxies are selected in LAE surveys – and how this evolves with redshift – it is important to establish a low-redshift reference sample that can be directly compared to high-redshift samples.  The lowest redshift where a direct Lya survey is currently possible is at a redshift of z~0.3 via the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX ) FUV grism data. Using the z~0.3 GALEX sample as an anchor point, it has been suggested that at low redshifts high equivalent width (EW) LAEs become less prevalent and that the amount of escaping Lya emission declines rapidly.  A number of explanations for these trends have been suggested including increasing dust content, increasing neutral column density, and/or increasing metallicity of star-forming galaxies at lower redshifts. However, the published z~0.3 GALEX sample is pre-selected from bright NUV objects.  Thus, objects with strong Lya emission but faint continuum (high-EW LAEs) could be missed.  In this talk, I will present my efforts to re-reduce the deepest archival GALEX FUV grism data and obtain a sample that is not biased against high-EW LAEs.  I will discuss the implications of this new sample on the evolutionary trends listed above.

Mar
28
Wed
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Ethan Dederick
Mar 28 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Ethan Dederick @ Science Hall 109

Seismic Inferences of Gas Giant Planets: Excitation & Interiors

Ethan Dederick, NMSU

Seismology has been the premier tool of study for understanding the interior structure of the Earth, the Sun, and even other stars. In this thesis we develop the framework for the first ever seismic inversion of a rapidly rotating gas giant planet. We extensively test this framework to ensure that the inversions are robust and operate within a linear regime. This framework is then applied to Saturn to solve for its interior density and sound speed profiles to better constrain its interior structure. This is done by incorporating observations of its mode frequencies derived from Linblad and Vertical Resonances in Saturn’s C-ring. We find that although the accuracy of the inversions is mitigated by the limited number of observed modes, we find that Saturn’s core density must be at least 8.97 +/- 0.01 g cm^{-3} below r/R_S = 0.3352 and its sound speed must be greater than 54.09 +/- 0.01 km s^{-1} below r/R_S = 0.2237. These new constraints can aid the development of accurate equations of state and thus help determine the composition in Saturn’s core. In addition, we investigate mode excitation and whether the \kappa-Mechanism can excite modes on Jupiter. While we find that the \kappa-Mechanism does not play a role in Jovian mode excitation, we discover a different opacity driven mechanism, The Radiative Suppression Mechanism, that can excite modes in hot giant planets orbiting extremely close to their host stars if they receive a stellar flux greater than 10^9~erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. Finally, we investigate whether moist convection is responsible for exciting Jovian modes. Mode driving can occur if, on average, one cloud column with a 1-km radius exists per 6423 km^2 or if ~43 storms with 200 columns, each with a radius of 25 km, erupt per day. While this seems unlikely given current observations, moist convection does have enough thermal energy to drive Jovian oscillations, should it be available to them.

Jan
27
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Candace Gray
Jan 27 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Candace Gray @ AY 119

APO Open House Info

Candace Gray

Jan
29
Wed
ASTR 500 – Graduate Seminar
Jan 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Jan
30
Thu
Astronomy on Tap
Jan 30 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Astronomy on Tap @ Bosque Brewing Las Cruces Public House

Join us for the inaugural Las Cruces chapter of Astronomy on Tap! Join local astronomers from the NMSU Astronomy Department for a night of fun, accessible space-related presentations, games, and prizes.

Please RSVP on the Bosque Brewing website if you’re planning on attending!
https://www.bosquebrewing.com/bosque-brewing-events

Feb
5
Wed
ASTR 500 – Graduate Seminar
Feb 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Feb
6
Thu
Colloquium: RESERVED
Feb 6 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: RESERVED @ BX102

Colloquium Title

Colloquium Speaker Name, Affiliation

Abstract text

Feb
10
Mon
Pizza lunch: Jon Holtzman
Feb 10 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Jon Holtzman @ AY 119

pyvista: a data reduction framework

Jon Holtzman, NMSU

Feb
11
Tue
Remote Colloquium: RESERVED
Feb 11 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Remote Colloquium: RESERVED @ MH 85

Colloquium Title

Colloquium Speaker Name, Affiliation

Abstract text