Calendar

Mar
2
Fri
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Gordon MacDonald
Mar 2 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Gordon MacDonald @ BX102

Colloquium Title

Gordon MacDonald, NMSU

Abstract

Aug
30
Fri
Colloquium: Lisa Young (Host: Rene Walterbos)
Aug 30 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Lisa Young (Host: Rene Walterbos) @ BX102

Cold Gas and the Evolution of Early-type Galaxies

Lisa Young, New Mexico Tech

A major theme of galaxy evolution is understanding how today’s Hubble sequence was
established — what makes some galaxies red spheroidals and others blue disks, and what
drives their relative numbers and their spatial distributions. One way of addressing these
questions is that galaxies themselves hold clues to their formation in their internal
structures. Recent observations of early-type galaxies in particular (ellipticals and
lenticulars) have shown that their seemingly placid, nearly featureless optical images can
be deceptive. Kinematic data show that the early-type galaxies have a wide variety of
internal kinematic structures that are the relics of dramatic merging and accretion
events. A surprising number of the early-type galaxies also contain cold atomic and
molecular gas, which is significant because their transitions to the red sequence must
involve removing most of their cold gas (the raw material for star formation). We can now
also read clues to the evolution of early-type galaxies in the kinematics and the
metallicity of their gas, and possibly also in the rare isotope abundance patterns in the
cold gas. Numerical simulations are beginning to work on reproducing these cold gas
properties, so that we can place the early-type galaxies into their broader context.

(incomplete video)

Nov
15
Fri
Colloquium: Phil Judge (Host James McAteer)
Nov 15 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Phil Judge (Host James McAteer) @ BX102

Using every photon to learn about the physics of solar plasmas

Phil Judge, High Altitude Observatory, Boulder CO.

The Sun has traditionally been the Rosetta Stone that can overcome the gap in regimes between laboratory and astronomical plasmas.   Theories applicable in the laboratory may not readily apply to solar plasmas, and vice-versa. Yet we still face challenges in understanding how the observable plasmas are produced, and why the magnetic field threading and energizing them must globally reverse every 11 years. I will give a general overview of currently pressing problems in solar physics, followed by two specific examples: one concerning the physics of flares through infrared spectroscopy and polarimetry, the other concerning how we might wring every last ounce of information from the emitted photons. Along the way I will introduce the NMSU-operated Dunn Solar Telescope, the new DKIST, Parker Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter, and suggest how we might take advantage of these new facilities to make lasting progress.

Feb
26
Wed
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Sean Sellers
Feb 26 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Sean Sellers @ Domenici Hall 006

A Multi-Wavelength Study of the Evolution of Solar Flares

Sean Sellers, NMSU