Calendar

Aug
31
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Alessondra Springmann
Aug 31 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Alessondra Springmann

Radar observations of asteroids

Apr
22
Fri
Colloquium: Paul Abell (Host: Nancy Chanover)
Apr 22 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Paul Abell  (Host: Nancy Chanover) @ BX102

Asteroid Exploration

Paul Abell, NASA Johnson Flight Center

I will present the current status of NASA’s Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) that is planned for launch in December 2021. Specifically I will discuss how a solar-electric powered robotic spacecraft will visit a large near-Earth asteroid (NEA), collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface, perform a planetary defense technique at the NEA, and return with the boulder into a stable orbit around the Moon. I will also discuss how astronauts aboard an Orion spacecraft will subsequently explore the boulder, conduct investigations during their extravehicular activities, and return samples to Earth. I will demonstrate how the ARM is part of NASA’s plan to advance technologies, capabilities, and spaceflight experience needed for a human mission to the Martian system in the 2030s. Finally I will discuss how the ARM and subsequent availability of the asteroidal material in cis-lunar space, provide significant opportunities to advance our knowledge of small bodies in terms of science, planetary defense, and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU).

Oct
23
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Kristian Finlator
Oct 23 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Kristian Finlator @ AY 119

Vastly Improved Simulations of the Hydrogen Reionization Epoch: Too Much for One Paper?

Oct
19
Fri
Colloquium: Sanchayeeta Borthakur (Host: Kristian Finlator)
Oct 19 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Sanchayeeta Borthakur (Host: Kristian Finlator) @ BX102

Understanding How Galaxies Reionized the Universe

 Sanchayeeta Borthakur, Arizona State University

Identifying the population of galaxies that was responsible for the reionization of the universe is a long-standing quest in astronomy. While young stars can produce large amounts of ionizing photons, the mechanism behind the escape of Lyman continuum photons (wavelength < 912 A) from star-forming regions has eluded us. To identify such galaxies and to understand the process of the escape of Lyman continuum, we present an indirect technique known as the residual flux technique. Using this technique, we identified (and later confirmed) the first low-redshift galaxy that has an escape fraction of ionizing flux of 21%. This leaky galaxy provides us with valuable insights into the physics of starburst-driven feedback. In addition, since direct detection of ionizing flux is impossible at the epoch of reionization, the residual flux technique presents a highly valuable tool for future studies to be conducted with the upcoming large telescopes such as the JWST.