Calendar

Apr
22
Fri
Colloquium: Paul Abell (Host: Nancy Chanover)
Apr 22 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Paul Abell  (Host: Nancy Chanover) @ BX102

Asteroid Exploration

Paul Abell, NASA Johnson Flight Center

I will present the current status of NASA’s Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) that is planned for launch in December 2021. Specifically I will discuss how a solar-electric powered robotic spacecraft will visit a large near-Earth asteroid (NEA), collect a multi-ton boulder from its surface, perform a planetary defense technique at the NEA, and return with the boulder into a stable orbit around the Moon. I will also discuss how astronauts aboard an Orion spacecraft will subsequently explore the boulder, conduct investigations during their extravehicular activities, and return samples to Earth. I will demonstrate how the ARM is part of NASA’s plan to advance technologies, capabilities, and spaceflight experience needed for a human mission to the Martian system in the 2030s. Finally I will discuss how the ARM and subsequent availability of the asteroidal material in cis-lunar space, provide significant opportunities to advance our knowledge of small bodies in terms of science, planetary defense, and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU).

May
2
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Agnar Hall 598
May 2 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
May
9
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Laurel Farris 598
May 9 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Laurel Farris 598

Laurel Farris 598

Nov
11
Fri
Colloquium: Amy Simon (Host: Nancy Chanover)
Nov 11 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Amy Simon (Host: Nancy Chanover) @ Biology Annex 102

Outer Planets Update

Dr. Amy Simon, NASA

The Hubble Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program is a yearly program for observing each of the outer planets over two full rotations. Observations began with Uranus in 2014, adding Neptune and Jupiter in 2015 (Saturn will be included in 2018, after the end of the Cassini mission). These observations have provided interesting new discoveries in their own right, but are also now being combined with observations from a number of facilities, including NASA’s IRTF, Keck, the VLA, as well as the Kepler and Spitzer missions to further expand the breadth of science they contain.  This talk will cover the latest observations for each of these planets and what we are learning from these data sets.

 

Apr
22
Mon
Pizza lunch: Sarah Kovac/David DeColibus
Apr 22 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Sarah Kovac/David DeColibus @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Apr
29
Mon
Pizza lunch: Kristen Luchsinger
Apr 29 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Kristen Luchsinger @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Sep
6
Fri
Colloquium: Brian Svoboda (Host: Moire Prescott)
Sep 6 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Brian Svoboda (Host: Moire Prescott) @ BX102

Starless clumps and the earliest phases of high-mass star formation in the Milky Way

Brian Svoboda, NRAO Jansky Fellow

High-mass stars are key to regulating the interstellar medium, star formation activity, and overall evolution of galaxies, but their formation remains an open problem in astrophysics. In order to understand the physical conditions during the earliest phases of high-mass star formation, I will present observational studies we have carried out on dense starless clump candidates (SCCs) that show no signatures of star formation activity. We identify 2223 SCCs from the 1.1 mm Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, systematically analyse their physical properties, and show that the starless phase is not represented by a single timescale, but evolves more rapidly with increasing clump mass. To investigate the sub-structure in SCCs at high spatial resolution, we investigate the 12 most high-mass SCCs within 5 kpc using ALMA. We find previously undetected low-luminosity protostars in 11 out of 12 SCCs, fragmentation equal to the thermal Jeans length of the clump, and no starless cores exceeding 30 solar masses. While uncertainties remain concerning the star formation efficiency in this sample, these observational facts are consistent with models where high-mass stars form from initially low- to intermediate-mass protostars that accrete most of their mass from the surrounding clump. I will also present on-going research studying gas inflow signatures with GBT/Argus and ALMA, and the dense core mass function with the JVLA.

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Dec
2
Mon
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Farhan and Oana)
Dec 2 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Farhan and Oana) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Farhan Hasan and Oana Vesa

Dec
4
Wed
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Ali and Matt)
Dec 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Ali and Matt) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Ali Hyder and Matt Varakian

Dec
9
Mon
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Minje)
Dec 9 @ 12:30 pm – 1:15 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Minje) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Minje Boem