Calendar

Sep
20
Wed
Colloquium PhD Defense: Jean McKeever
Sep 20 @ 3:00 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium PhD Defense: Jean McKeever @ Business College 103

Asteroseismology of Red Giants: The Detailed Modeling of Red Giants in Eclipsing Binary Systems

Jean McKeever, NMSU

Asteroseismology is an invaluable tool that allows one to peer into the inside of a star and know its fundamental stellar properties with relative ease. There has been much exploration of solar-like oscillations within red giants with recent advances in technology, leading to new innovations in observing. The Kepler mission, with its 4-year observations of a single patch of sky, has opened the floodgates on asteroseismic studies. Binary star systems are also an invaluable tool for their ability to provide independent constraints on fundamental stellar parameters such as mass and radius. The asteroseismic scaling laws link observables in the light curves of stars to the physical parameters in the star, providing a unique tool to study large populations of stars quite easily. In this work we present our 4-year radial velocity observing program to provide accurate dynamical masses for 16 red giants in eclipsing binary systems. From this we find that asteroseismology overestimates the mass and radius of red giants by 15% and 5% respectively. We further attempt to model the pulsations of a few of these stars using stellar evolution and oscillation codes. The goal is to determine which masses are correct and if there is a physical cause for the discrepancy in asteroseismic masses. We find there are many challenges to modeling evolved stars such as red giants and we address a few of the major concerns. These systems are some of the best studied systems to date and further exploration of their asteroseismic mysteries is inevitable.

 

Nov
9
Thu
Public Talk: “Preparing to Explore the Universe with the James Webb Space Telescope” – Dr. Jane Rigby (NASA Goddard)
Nov 9 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Public Talk: "Preparing to Explore the Universe with the James Webb Space Telescope" - Dr. Jane Rigby (NASA Goddard) @ Gerald Thomas Hall, Room 194

Preparing to Explore the Universe with the James Webb Space Telescope

Dr. Jane Rigby (NASA Goddard, Deputy Project Scientist for JWST)

Abstract: NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), scheduled to be launched in 2019, will revolutionize our view of the Universe.  As the scientific successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, JWST will rewrite the textbooks and return gorgeous images and spectra of our universe.   In my talk, I will show how JWST will revolutionize our understanding of how galaxies and supermassive black holes formed in the first billion years after the Big Bang, and how they evolved over cosmic time.  I’ll describe how our international team is preparing for launch, how we decide what targets to observe, and how we are testing the telescope to be sure it will work in space.

More information about the telescope can be found at https://www.jwst.nasa.gov/.

 

 

Mar
29
Thu
Colloquium (Joint with Physics): Jim Fuller (Host: Ethan Dederick)
Mar 29 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Colloquium (Joint with Physics): Jim Fuller (Host: Ethan Dederick) @ Gardiner Hall 230

Surprising Impacts of Gravity Waves

Jim Fuller, Caltech

Gravity waves are low frequency fluid oscillations restored by buoyancy forces in planetary and stellar interiors. Despite their ubiquity, the importance of gravity waves in evolutionary processes and asteroseismology has only recently been appreciated. For instance, Kepler asteroseismic data has revealed gravity modes in thousands of red giant stars, providing unprecedented measurements of core structure and rotation. I will show how gravity modes (or lack thereof) can also reveal strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giants, and I will demonstrate that strong fields appear to be common within “retired” A stars but are absent in their lower-mass counterparts. In the late phase evolution of massive stars approaching core-collapse, vigorous convection excites gravity waves that can redistribute huge amounts of energy within the star. I will present preliminary models of this process, showing how wave energy redistribution can drive outbursts and enhanced mass loss in the final years of massive star evolution, with important consequences for the appearance of subsequent supernovae.
Oct
8
Mon
Pizza lunch: Patrick Gaulme
Oct 8 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Patrick Gaulme @ AY 119

Red giants, eclipsing binaries, and asteroseismology.

Patrick Gaulme, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research

Apr
22
Mon
Pizza lunch: Sarah Kovac/David DeColibus
Apr 22 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Sarah Kovac/David DeColibus @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Apr
29
Mon
Pizza lunch: Kristen Luchsinger
Apr 29 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Kristen Luchsinger @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Oct
25
Fri
Colloquium: Shun Karato (Host: Jason Jackiewicz)
Oct 25 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Shun Karato (Host: Jason Jackiewicz) @ BX102

Solving the Puzzles of the Moon

Shun Karato, Yale University

After 50 years from the first landing of men on the Moon, about 380 kg of samples were collected by the Apollo mission. Chemical analyses of these samples together with a theory of planetary formation led to a “giant impact” paradigm (in mid 1970s). In this paradigm, the Moon was formed in the later stage of Earth formation (not the very late stage, though), when the proto-Earth was hit by an impactor with a modest size (~ Mars size) at an oblique angle. Such an impact is a natural consequence of planetary formation from a proto-planetary nebula. This collision may have kicked out mantle materials from the proto-Earth to form the Moon. This model explains mostly rocky composition of the Moon and the large angular momentum of the Earth-Moon system. High temperatures caused by an impact likely removed much of the volatile components such as water.

However, two recent geochemical observations cast doubt about the validity of such a paradigm. They include (i) not-so-dry Moon suggested from the analysis of basaltic inclusions in olivine, and (ii) the high degree of similarities in many isotopes. The first observation is obviously counter-intuitive, but the second one is also hard to reconcile with the standard model of a giant impact, because many models show that a giant impact produces the Moon mostly from the impactor. In this presentation, I will show how one can solve these puzzles by a combination of physics/chemistry of materials with some basic physics of a giant impact.

Dec
2
Mon
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Farhan and Oana)
Dec 2 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Farhan and Oana) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Farhan Hasan and Oana Vesa

Dec
4
Wed
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Ali and Matt)
Dec 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Ali and Matt) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Ali Hyder and Matt Varakian

Dec
9
Mon
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Minje)
Dec 9 @ 12:30 pm – 1:15 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Minje) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Minje Boem