Calendar

Oct
29
Mon
Planetary Group meeting
Oct 29 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Nov
2
Fri
Colloquium: Kate Follette (Host: Moire Prescott)
Nov 2 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Kate Follette (Host: Moire Prescott) @ BX102

How to Take Pictures of Baby Planets

Kate Follette, Amherst College

Of the thousands of known extrasolar planets, why are the dozen or so directly imaged exoplanets among the most important despite their apparently anomalous properties within the general exoplanet population (>10 astronomical units, >2x the mass of Jupiter)? What are the prospects for (and recent successes in) detecting younger, lower-mass and/or closer-in planets via direct imaging? I will discuss the current state of the art in the field of high-contrast imaging of extrasolar planets and the disks of gas and dust from which planets form (“circumstellar disks”). I will place particular emphasis on a subset of objects that host both disks and (likely) planets – the so-called “transitional disks”. These young circumstellar disks are almost certainly actively undergoing planet formation, and yet the presence of disk material complicates our ability to isolate light from planets and/or protoplanets embedded within them. I will end by discussing recent results from the Giant Accreting Protoplanet Survey (GAPplanetS) of 15 southern-hemisphere transition disks. The GAPlanetS survey aims to find protoplanets embedded in transitional disks through a distinctive signature at hydrogen wavelengths, and has so far discovered: 2-3 planets, 1 accreting M-dwarf stellar companion, and 1 disk feature masquerading as a planet.

Nov
5
Mon
Pizza lunch: Heidi Sanchez
Nov 5 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Heidi Sanchez @ AY 119

The Sunspot Solar Observatory Visitor Center

Heidi Sanchez, Sunspot Solar Observatory, NMSU

Nov
9
Fri
Colloquium: Laura Chomiuk (Host: Moire Prescott)
Nov 9 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Laura Chomiuk (Host: Moire Prescott) @ BX102

Rethinking the Fundamentals of Classical Nova Explosions

Laura Chomiuk, MSU

Over the past few years, a revolution has been taking place in our understanding of classical novae, largely driven by the discovery of GeV gamma-rays emanating from these garden-variety explosions. These gamma-rays hint that shocks are energetically important—perhaps even dominant—in novae. I will present our burgeoning understanding of shocks in novae, from both multi-wavelength observational and theoretical perspectives, and illustrate how novae can be used as testbeds to understand other shock-powered explosions.

Nov
12
Mon
Pizza lunch: Nur Berdalieva and Shukur Kholikov
Nov 12 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Nur Berdalieva and Shukur Kholikov @ AY 119

Past and Present Astronomy in Uzbekistan

Nur Berdalieva (Astronomical Institute of Uzbekistan) and Shukur Kholikov (National Solar Observatory)

Planetary Group meeting
Nov 12 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Nov
26
Mon
Planetary Group meeting
Nov 26 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Nov
30
Fri
Colloquium: John Stocke (Host: Rene Walterbos)
Nov 30 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: John Stocke (Host: Rene Walterbos) @ BX102

Colloquium Title

Colloquium Speaker Name, Affiliation

Abstract text

Dec
3
Mon
Pizza lunch: Annie Hedlund, Alec Herczeg, and Julie Imig
Dec 3 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: Annie Hedlund, Alec Herczeg, and Julie Imig @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Sep
6
Fri
Colloquium: Brian Svoboda (Host: Moire Prescott)
Sep 6 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Brian Svoboda (Host: Moire Prescott) @ BX102

Starless clumps and the earliest phases of high-mass star formation in the Milky Way

Brian Svoboda, NRAO Jansky Fellow

High-mass stars are key to regulating the interstellar medium, star formation activity, and overall evolution of galaxies, but their formation remains an open problem in astrophysics. In order to understand the physical conditions during the earliest phases of high-mass star formation, I will present observational studies we have carried out on dense starless clump candidates (SCCs) that show no signatures of star formation activity. We identify 2223 SCCs from the 1.1 mm Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey, systematically analyse their physical properties, and show that the starless phase is not represented by a single timescale, but evolves more rapidly with increasing clump mass. To investigate the sub-structure in SCCs at high spatial resolution, we investigate the 12 most high-mass SCCs within 5 kpc using ALMA. We find previously undetected low-luminosity protostars in 11 out of 12 SCCs, fragmentation equal to the thermal Jeans length of the clump, and no starless cores exceeding 30 solar masses. While uncertainties remain concerning the star formation efficiency in this sample, these observational facts are consistent with models where high-mass stars form from initially low- to intermediate-mass protostars that accrete most of their mass from the surrounding clump. I will also present on-going research studying gas inflow signatures with GBT/Argus and ALMA, and the dense core mass function with the JVLA.

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