Calendar

Nov
21
Thu
Planetary Group meeting
Nov 21 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Nov
22
Fri
Colloquium: Rixin Li (Host: Wladimir Lyra)
Nov 22 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Rixin Li (Host: Wladimir Lyra) @ BX102

Simulating Planetesimal Formation in the Kuiper Belt and Beyond

Rixin Li, University of Arizona

A critical step in planet formation is to build super-km-sized planetesimals in protoplanetary disks. The origin and demographics of planetesimals are crucial to understanding the Solar System, circumstellar disks, and exoplanets. I will overview the current status of planetesimal formation theory. Specifically, I will present our recent simulations of planetesimal formation by the streaming instability, a mechanism to aerodynamically concentrate pebbles in protoplanetary disks. I will then discuss the connections between our numerical models and recent astronomical observations and Solar System explorations. I will explain why all planetesimals likely formed as binaries.

Dec
2
Mon
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Farhan and Oana)
Dec 2 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Farhan and Oana) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Farhan Hasan and Oana Vesa

Dec
4
Wed
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Ali and Matt)
Dec 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Ali and Matt) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Ali Hyder and Matt Varakian

Dec
5
Thu
Planetary Group meeting
Dec 5 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Dec
6
Fri
Colloquium: Elise Boera (Host: Kristian Finlator)
Dec 6 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Elise Boera (Host: Kristian Finlator) @ BX102

Revealing reionization with the thermal history of the intergalactic medium

Elisa Boera, SISSA Trieste

During hydrogen reionization the UV radiation from the first luminous sources injected vast amount of energy into the intergalactic medium, photo-heating the gas to tens of thousands of degree Kelvin. This increase in temperature has left measurable `imprints’ in the thermal history of the cosmic gas: a peak in the temperature evolution at the mean density and a smoothing out of the gas in the physical space by the increased gas pressure following reionization (i.e. Jeans smoothing effect). The structures of the HI Lyman-alpha forest at high redshift are sensitive to both these effects and therefore represent a powerful tool to understand when and how reionization happened. I will present the most recent constraints on the thermal history of the intergalactic medium obtained using the Lyman-alpha forest flux power spectrum at z>5. I will show how these results can be used to obtain information on the timing and the sources of the reionization process and I will discuss their consistency with different possible reionization scenarios.
Dec
9
Mon
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Minje)
Dec 9 @ 12:30 pm – 1:15 pm
Pizza lunch: ASTR 598 (Minje) @ AY 119

ASTR 598

Minje Boem

Jan
30
Thu
Astronomy on Tap
Jan 30 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Astronomy on Tap @ Bosque Brewing Las Cruces Public House

Join us for the inaugural Las Cruces chapter of Astronomy on Tap! Join local astronomers from the NMSU Astronomy Department for a night of fun, accessible space-related presentations, games, and prizes.

Please RSVP on the Bosque Brewing website if you’re planning on attending!
https://www.bosquebrewing.com/bosque-brewing-events

Feb
27
Thu
Astronomy on Tap
Feb 27 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Astronomy on Tap @ 575 Cruces Crafted Cocktails

Join us for the second round of Astronomy on Tap: Las Cruces! Join local astronomers from the NMSU Astronomy Department for a night of fun, accessible space-related presentations, games, and prizes.

You can access the Facebook event and RSVP here: https://www.facebook.com/events/2827115720734964/

May
29
Fri
Remote Colloquium Thesis Defense: Drew Chojnowski
May 29 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Remote Colloquium Thesis Defense: Drew Chojnowski @ Online

H-Band Spectroscopy of Exotic, Massive Stars

Drew Chojnowski, NMSU

We report on spectroscopy of exotic B-type emission line (Be) stars and chemically peculiar (CP) stars in the near-infrared (NIR) H-band, using data provided by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, one of the sub-surveys of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Between 2011-2020, SDSS/APOGEE has observed more than a million stars in the Milky Way Galaxy (MW), with roughly 10% of the targets being hot, blue stars that serve as telluric absorption standard stars (TSS). The TSS are selected mostly on the basis of having blue raw J-K color indices with no preference for any particular spectral type that might be known from optical spectroscopy. This targeting strategy has led to the TSS being a mixed bag, with those observed in the MW Halo typically being F-type stars that are only slightly more massive than the Sun, and with those observed in the MW Disk and Bulge being OBA-type stars of a few up to 20 times the mass of the Sun. While the vast majority of the TSS are superficially normal main sequence stars, the inclusion of large numbers of Be and CP stars has serendipitously resulted in the largest ever homogeneous spectroscopic surveys of these stellar classes, both of which present observational anomalies that remain very poorly understand despite more than a hundred years of research. Prior to SDSS/APOGEE, the H-band spectra of Be and CP stars had only been discussed in a handful of studies, all of which used small numbers of spectra of considerably lower resolution than the R=22,500 of the APOGEE instruments. The material presented in this thesis therefore represents the first ever detailed studies of Be and CP stars in the H-band, while also greatly expanding the known samples through discovery of many hundreds of new examples.