Calendar

Nov
30
Thu
Solar Group meeting
Nov 30 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Inclusive Astronomy
Nov 30 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Dec
1
Fri
PDS Atmospheres Node meeting
Dec 1 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am
Colloquium: Laura Keating (Host: Kristian Finlator)
Dec 1 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Laura Keating (Host: Kristian Finlator) @ BX102

Colloquium Title

Colloquium Speaker Name, Affiliation

Abstract text

Dec
4
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Karen Kinemuchi
Dec 4 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Karen Kinemuchi @ AY 119

Life at Apache Point Observatory

Dec
7
Thu
Solar Group meeting
Dec 7 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Inclusive Astronomy
Dec 7 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Dec
8
Fri
Colloquium – Dean Pesnell (Host: James McAteer)
Dec 8 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium - Dean Pesnell (Host: James McAteer) @ BX102

SDO, the Sun, the Universe

Dean Pesnell, NASA / GSFC

ABSTRACT: The Sun is our best example for how stars evolve and behave. It is the only star whose surface is well-resolved in time and space. It is the only star which local helioseisomology can look into and through. One tool we to study the Sun is the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), a NASA satellite that has been returning data for seven years. SDO focuses on the variations in the Sun caused by changes in the magnetic field generated by the convection zone.I will describe some aspects of SDO science that can be directly related to Sun-like stars. First are spectral irradiance measurements in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths that contribute to the loss of planetary atmospheres. Next are failed filament eruptions that fall back onto the surface as a form of accretion. Finally, how the magnetic field evolves from solar minimum to maximum and back is giving us clues about predicting that magnetic field. Please come and have a look at how studying the Sun informs our knowledge of stars.

Dec
14
Thu
Solar Group meeting
Dec 14 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Sep
28
Fri
Colloquium: Bharat Ratra (Host: Anatoly Klypin)
Sep 28 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Bharat Ratra (Host: Anatoly Klypin) @ BX102

Spatial Curvature, Dark Energy Dynamics, Neither, or Both?

Bharat Ratra, Kansas State University

Experiments and observations over the two last decades have persuaded cosmologists that (as yet undetected) dark energy is by far the main component of the energy budget of the current universe. I review a few simple dark energy models and compare their predictions to observational data, to derive dark energy model-parameter constraints and to test consistency of different data sets. I conclude with a list of open cosmological questions.