Calendar

Mar
9
Fri
Colloquium: Wilson Cauley (Host: Kristen Luchsinger)
Mar 9 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Wilson Cauley (Host: Kristen Luchsinger) @ BX102

Multi-pronged investigations into exoplanetary magnetic fields

Wilson Cauley (Arizona State University)

Efforts in exoplanet characterization have led to some very precise determinations of planetary densities, compositions, and even accurate maps of active region and spot locations on stellar surfaces. Exoplanet magnetic fields, however, remain elusive. While radio observations continue to push into the low-mass brown dwarf regime, no emission from a planetary-mass object has been confirmed. I will discuss some of the efforts involving alternate methods for probing exoplanet magnetic fields and how they stack up so far against the prospects for detection via radio emission.

Mar
12
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Caitlin Doughty
Mar 12 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Caitlin Doughty @ AY 119

Using CGM metal absorbers to look for galaxies

Mar
15
Thu
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Drew Chojnowski
Mar 15 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Drew Chojnowski @ Domenici Hall 102

The Circumstellar Disks and Binary Companions of Be Stars

Drew Chojnowski, NMSU

Tremendous progress has been made over the past two decades toward understanding Be stars, but a number of key aspects of them remain enigmatic. The unsolved mysteries include identification of the mechanism responsible for disk formation, the reason this mechanism occasionally turns off or on unexpectedly, the source of viscosity in the circumstellar disks, and the cause of slowly precessing density perturbations in the disks of many or most Be stars. On a deeper level, the origin of Be stars’ near-critical rotation is unknown, with one possible explanation being spin-up due to interaction with a binary companion. A better understanding of these stars is needed, with a particular focus on high-mass binaries being warranted in the age of gravitational wave astronomy. In this dissertation, I will extend the knowledge and understanding of Be stars through a series of three projects. First, I will present and describe the largest ever homogeneous, spectroscopic sample of Be stars to date. I will then focus on investigation of a rare class of Be stars found in binary systems with hot, low mass companions. The second project will present detailed characterization and modeling of HD~55606, a newly discovered member of this class. Finally, I will discuss the results of spectroscopic monitoring of seven newly discovered systems and establish or place limits on the orbital parameters of the binary components.

Mar
16
Fri
Observatory Open House
Mar 16 @ 9:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Observatory Open House

Your hosts for the March Campus Observatory Open House are Jon Holtzman, Ethan Dederick, Lauren Kahre, and Emma Dahl.

Mar
27
Tue
Colloquium: Tim Fitzpatrick
Mar 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Colloquium: Tim Fitzpatrick @ CFTA (Center for the Arts) 209

SHINE: code for everything

Tim Fitzpatrick, Artist, Scotland

SHINE, ’Code for Everything’ is an on-going art work by Tim Fitzpatrick in collaboration with astronomer Anne-Marie Weijmans of the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of St Andrews. The art takes its inspiration from the Anne-Marie’s work and the science of spectroscopy and, in particular, through a series of visual and experimental representations of the individual emission spectra of the elements.

Tim Fitzpatrick’s principal development of the work is through his fascination with the extraordinary level of detail – and therefore information – contained in the spectrum of starlight. As the work progresses and evolves he seeks to develop the theme of the linguistics of the light of the elements and, by extension, our reading of the light of the universe and our place in it, as described in a series of codes.

Mar
28
Wed
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Ethan Dederick
Mar 28 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Ethan Dederick @ Science Hall 109

Seismic Inferences of Gas Giant Planets: Excitation & Interiors

Ethan Dederick, NMSU

Seismology has been the premier tool of study for understanding the interior structure of the Earth, the Sun, and even other stars. In this thesis we develop the framework for the first ever seismic inversion of a rapidly rotating gas giant planet. We extensively test this framework to ensure that the inversions are robust and operate within a linear regime. This framework is then applied to Saturn to solve for its interior density and sound speed profiles to better constrain its interior structure. This is done by incorporating observations of its mode frequencies derived from Linblad and Vertical Resonances in Saturn’s C-ring. We find that although the accuracy of the inversions is mitigated by the limited number of observed modes, we find that Saturn’s core density must be at least 8.97 +/- 0.01 g cm^{-3} below r/R_S = 0.3352 and its sound speed must be greater than 54.09 +/- 0.01 km s^{-1} below r/R_S = 0.2237. These new constraints can aid the development of accurate equations of state and thus help determine the composition in Saturn’s core. In addition, we investigate mode excitation and whether the \kappa-Mechanism can excite modes on Jupiter. While we find that the \kappa-Mechanism does not play a role in Jovian mode excitation, we discover a different opacity driven mechanism, The Radiative Suppression Mechanism, that can excite modes in hot giant planets orbiting extremely close to their host stars if they receive a stellar flux greater than 10^9~erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. Finally, we investigate whether moist convection is responsible for exciting Jovian modes. Mode driving can occur if, on average, one cloud column with a 1-km radius exists per 6423 km^2 or if ~43 storms with 200 columns, each with a radius of 25 km, erupt per day. While this seems unlikely given current observations, moist convection does have enough thermal energy to drive Jovian oscillations, should it be available to them.

Mar
29
Thu
Colloquium (Joint with Physics): Jim Fuller (Host: Ethan Dederick)
Mar 29 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Colloquium (Joint with Physics): Jim Fuller (Host: Ethan Dederick) @ Gardiner Hall 230

Surprising Impacts of Gravity Waves

Jim Fuller, Caltech

Gravity waves are low frequency fluid oscillations restored by buoyancy forces in planetary and stellar interiors. Despite their ubiquity, the importance of gravity waves in evolutionary processes and asteroseismology has only recently been appreciated. For instance, Kepler asteroseismic data has revealed gravity modes in thousands of red giant stars, providing unprecedented measurements of core structure and rotation. I will show how gravity modes (or lack thereof) can also reveal strong magnetic fields in the cores of red giants, and I will demonstrate that strong fields appear to be common within “retired” A stars but are absent in their lower-mass counterparts. In the late phase evolution of massive stars approaching core-collapse, vigorous convection excites gravity waves that can redistribute huge amounts of energy within the star. I will present preliminary models of this process, showing how wave energy redistribution can drive outbursts and enhanced mass loss in the final years of massive star evolution, with important consequences for the appearance of subsequent supernovae.
Apr
2
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Michael Engelhardt (Physics), “The quarks in the proton go round and round …”
Apr 2 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Michael Engelhardt (Physics), "The quarks in the proton go round and round ..." @ AY 119

The quarks in the proton go round and round …

Apr
6
Fri
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Sten Hasselquist
Apr 6 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Sten Hasselquist @ BX102

Colloquium Title

Sten Hasselquist, NMSU

Abstract

Apr
13
Fri
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Emma Dahl
Apr 13 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Emma Dahl @ BX102

Colloquium Title

Emma Dahl, NMSU

Abstract text