Calendar

Aug
28
Fri
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Laura Mayorga
Aug 28 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Laura Mayorga @ BX102

Probing Exoplanet Atmospheric Properties from Phase Variations and Polarization

Laura Mayorga, NMSU

The study of exoplanets is evolving past simple transit and Doppler method discovery and characterization. One of the many goals of the upcoming mission WFIRST-AFTA is to directly image giant exoplanets with a coronagraph. We undertake a study to determine the types of exoplanets that missions such as WFIRST will encounter and what instruments these missions require to best characterize giant planet atmospheres. We will first complete a benchmark study of how Jupiter reflects and scatters light as a function of phase angle. We will use Cassini flyby data from late 2000 to measure Jupiter’s phase curve, spherical albedo, and degree of polarization. Using Jupiter as a comparison, we will then study a sample of exoplanet atmosphere models generated to explore the atmospheric parameter space of giant planets and estimate what WFIRST might observe. Our study will provide valuable refinements to Jupiter-like models of planet evolution and atmospheric composition. We will also help inform future missions of what instruments are needed to characterize similar planets and what science goals will further our knowledge of giant worlds in our universe.

Nov
9
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Karen Kinemuchi
Nov 9 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Karen Kinemuchi

High-precision studies of RR Lyrae Stars

Feb
29
Mon
Pizza Lunch: James McAteer
Feb 29 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: James McAteer @ AY 119

In Life, 2 things are inevitable

 

Nov
11
Fri
Colloquium: Amy Simon (Host: Nancy Chanover)
Nov 11 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Amy Simon (Host: Nancy Chanover) @ Biology Annex 102

Outer Planets Update

Dr. Amy Simon, NASA

The Hubble Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program is a yearly program for observing each of the outer planets over two full rotations. Observations began with Uranus in 2014, adding Neptune and Jupiter in 2015 (Saturn will be included in 2018, after the end of the Cassini mission). These observations have provided interesting new discoveries in their own right, but are also now being combined with observations from a number of facilities, including NASA’s IRTF, Keck, the VLA, as well as the Kepler and Spitzer missions to further expand the breadth of science they contain.  This talk will cover the latest observations for each of these planets and what we are learning from these data sets.

 

Jan
24
Wed
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Laurel Farris
Jan 24 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Laurel Farris @ Science Hall, Room 110

Characterizing the oscillatory response of the chromosphere during solar flares

Laurel Farris; NMSU Astronomy Department

Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) are observed in the emission of solar flares over a wide range of wavelengths,

particularly in the radio and hard x-ray regimes where non-thermal emission dominates. These pulsations are

considered to be an intrinsic feature of flares, yet the exact mechanism that triggers them remains unclear.

There have been reports of an increase in the oscillatory power at 3-minute periods (the local acoustic

cutoff frequency) in the solar chromosphere associated with flaring events. I propose to investigate the

chromospheric response to flares by inspecting the spatial and temporal onset and evolution of the 3-minute

oscillatory power, along with any QPP patterns that may appear in chromospheric emission. The analysis

will be extended to multiple flares, and will include time before, during, and after the main event. To test

initial methods, the target of interest was the well-studied 2011 February 15 X-class flare. Data from two

instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used in the preliminary study, including

continuum images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and UV images at 1600 and 1700

Angstroms from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Later, spectroscopic data from the Interface

Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) will be used to examine velocity patterns in addition to intensity.

Mar
15
Thu
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Drew Chojnowski
Mar 15 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Drew Chojnowski @ Domenici Hall 102

The Circumstellar Disks and Binary Companions of Be Stars

Drew Chojnowski, NMSU

Tremendous progress has been made over the past two decades toward understanding Be stars, but a number of key aspects of them remain enigmatic. The unsolved mysteries include identification of the mechanism responsible for disk formation, the reason this mechanism occasionally turns off or on unexpectedly, the source of viscosity in the circumstellar disks, and the cause of slowly precessing density perturbations in the disks of many or most Be stars. On a deeper level, the origin of Be stars’ near-critical rotation is unknown, with one possible explanation being spin-up due to interaction with a binary companion. A better understanding of these stars is needed, with a particular focus on high-mass binaries being warranted in the age of gravitational wave astronomy. In this dissertation, I will extend the knowledge and understanding of Be stars through a series of three projects. First, I will present and describe the largest ever homogeneous, spectroscopic sample of Be stars to date. I will then focus on investigation of a rare class of Be stars found in binary systems with hot, low mass companions. The second project will present detailed characterization and modeling of HD~55606, a newly discovered member of this class. Finally, I will discuss the results of spectroscopic monitoring of seven newly discovered systems and establish or place limits on the orbital parameters of the binary components.

Mar
28
Wed
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Ethan Dederick
Mar 28 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium PhD Thesis Defense: Ethan Dederick @ Science Hall 109

Seismic Inferences of Gas Giant Planets: Excitation & Interiors

Ethan Dederick, NMSU

Seismology has been the premier tool of study for understanding the interior structure of the Earth, the Sun, and even other stars. In this thesis we develop the framework for the first ever seismic inversion of a rapidly rotating gas giant planet. We extensively test this framework to ensure that the inversions are robust and operate within a linear regime. This framework is then applied to Saturn to solve for its interior density and sound speed profiles to better constrain its interior structure. This is done by incorporating observations of its mode frequencies derived from Linblad and Vertical Resonances in Saturn’s C-ring. We find that although the accuracy of the inversions is mitigated by the limited number of observed modes, we find that Saturn’s core density must be at least 8.97 +/- 0.01 g cm^{-3} below r/R_S = 0.3352 and its sound speed must be greater than 54.09 +/- 0.01 km s^{-1} below r/R_S = 0.2237. These new constraints can aid the development of accurate equations of state and thus help determine the composition in Saturn’s core. In addition, we investigate mode excitation and whether the \kappa-Mechanism can excite modes on Jupiter. While we find that the \kappa-Mechanism does not play a role in Jovian mode excitation, we discover a different opacity driven mechanism, The Radiative Suppression Mechanism, that can excite modes in hot giant planets orbiting extremely close to their host stars if they receive a stellar flux greater than 10^9~erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. Finally, we investigate whether moist convection is responsible for exciting Jovian modes. Mode driving can occur if, on average, one cloud column with a 1-km radius exists per 6423 km^2 or if ~43 storms with 200 columns, each with a radius of 25 km, erupt per day. While this seems unlikely given current observations, moist convection does have enough thermal energy to drive Jovian oscillations, should it be available to them.

Apr
13
Fri
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Emma Dahl
Apr 13 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Emma Dahl @ BX102

Colloquium Title

Emma Dahl, NMSU

Abstract text