Calendar

Nov
9
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Karen Kinemuchi
Nov 9 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Karen Kinemuchi

High-precision studies of RR Lyrae Stars

Feb
5
Fri
Colloquium: Steve Finkelstein (Host: Kristian Finlator)
Feb 5 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Steve Finkelstein   (Host: Kristian Finlator) @ BX102

Galaxy Evolution during the Epoch of Reionization

 Steve Finkelstein,  University of Texas at Austin

 

                       Abstract: The advent of the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope has heralded a new era in our ability to study the earliest phases of galaxy formation and evolution.  The number of candidates for galaxies now known at redshifts greater than six has grown to be in the thousands.  This allows us to move beyond mere counting of galaxies, to endeavor to understand the detailed physics regulating the growth of galaxies.  I will review the recent progress our group in Texas has made in this arena using the exquisite datasets from the CANDELS and Frontier Fields programs.  Specifically, our detailed new measurements of both the evolution of the stellar mass function and rest-frame UV luminosity function now allow us to probe the effect of feedback on low-mass galaxies, the star-formation efficiency in high-mass galaxies, and the contribution of galaxies to the reionization of the universe.  Our most recent result comes from the Frontier Fields, where we have used an advanced technique to remove the light from the cluster galaxies to uncover z > 6 galaxies as faint as M_UV=-13.  Our updated luminosity functions show no sign of a turnover down to these extremely faint levels, providing the first empirical test of reionization models which require such faint galaxies, and is in modest tension with simulations which predict a turnover at brighter levels.   I will also discuss our spectroscopic followup efforts, which have yielded two of the four highest redshift confirmed galaxies, and also provide further insight into reionization, by the scattering of Lyman alpha emission by neutral gas in the intergalactic medium.  I will conclude with a look ahead to the problems we can expect to tackle with ALMA, JWST, and even more future facilities.

Nov
11
Fri
Colloquium: Amy Simon (Host: Nancy Chanover)
Nov 11 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Amy Simon (Host: Nancy Chanover) @ Biology Annex 102

Outer Planets Update

Dr. Amy Simon, NASA

The Hubble Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program is a yearly program for observing each of the outer planets over two full rotations. Observations began with Uranus in 2014, adding Neptune and Jupiter in 2015 (Saturn will be included in 2018, after the end of the Cassini mission). These observations have provided interesting new discoveries in their own right, but are also now being combined with observations from a number of facilities, including NASA’s IRTF, Keck, the VLA, as well as the Kepler and Spitzer missions to further expand the breadth of science they contain.  This talk will cover the latest observations for each of these planets and what we are learning from these data sets.