Calendar

Oct
16
Fri
Colloquium: Doug Biesecker
Oct 16 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Doug Biesecker @ BX102

Why Space Weather Matters and How Forecasting Will Improve in the DSCOVR Era

Doug Biesecker, NOAA/NWS/Space Weather Prediction Center

Space Weather is a growing enterprise, with growing recognition of its importance inside and outside government.  The largest concern is with the electric power grid, but impacts to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) are also significant.  Other areas of impact include satellites and human space flight, and high frequency communication for aviation, mariners, and emergency responders, among many.  The NOAA National Weather Service’s Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) is the nation’s official source of space weather watches, warnings and alerts.  SWPC does this with a 24×7 staffed operation that monitors the Sun, solar wind, and geospace environment taking advantage of a broad suite of observations and models to provide the best forecasts possible.  In conjunction with the growing recognition of space weather, NOAA launched its first mission, the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), out of the Earth’s orbit to an orbit about the L1 Lagrange point.  This is also NOAA’s first satellite mission where space weather is the primary mission and DSCOVR marks the first of what is expected to be a long series of space weather monitoring satellites.  NOAA is also bringing numerical space weather models into the mix of models running on the nation’s supercomputers.  Numerical space weather models have demonstrated the ability to improve the onset time of space weather storms and will, for the first time, allow regional geomagnetic forecasting.  Instead of describing conditions on Earth with a single number, customers will have forecasts tailored to their location.

 

Oct
23
Fri
Tombaugh Observatory Open House
Oct 23 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory

Open to the public.

Faculty member: Kristian Finlator

Graduate Students: Sten, Hasselquist, Jodi Berdis, Kathryn Steakley

 

 

 

 

Oct
30
Fri
Colloquium: Sergio Rodriguez
Oct 30 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Sergio Rodriguez @ BX102

BOSS DR12 survey: Clustering of galaxies and Dark Matter Haloes

Sergio Rodriguez, UAM, Madrid and Cal. Berkeley

BOSS SDSS-III is the largest redshift survey for the large scale structure and a powerful sample for the study of the low redshift Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations. We combine the features of the survey, such as, geometry, angular incompleteness and stellar mass incompleteness, with the BigMultiDark cosmological simulation to do a study of the distribution of galaxies in the dark matter halos. Using this large N-Body simulation and the halo abundance matching technique, we found a remarkably good agreement with the 2-point and 3-point statistics of the data.

Nov
6
Fri
Colloquium: John Wisniewski
Nov 6 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  John Wisniewski @ BX102

Diagnosing the SEEDS of Planet Formation

John Wisniewski, University of Oklahoma

Circumstellar disks provide a useful astrophysical diagnostic of the formation and early evolution of exoplanets. It is commonly believed that young protoplanetary disks serve as the birthplace of planets, while older debris disks can provide insight into the architecture of exoplanetary systems. In this talk, I will discuss how one can use high contrast imaging techniques to spatially resolve nearby circumstellar disk systems, and how this imagery can be used to search for evidence of recently formed planetary bodies. I will focus on results from the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) project, as well as some ongoing follow-up work.

Nov
20
Fri
Tombaugh Observatory Open House
Nov 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory

Open to the public.

Faculty member: James McAteer

Graduate Students: Nigel Mathes, Emma Dahl, Laura Mayorga

 

 

Dec
4
Fri
Colloquium: Brian Jackson
Dec 4 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Brian Jackson @ BX102

On the Edge: Exoplanets with Orbital Periods Shorter Than a Peter Jackson Movie

Brian Jackson, Boise State Univeristy

From wispy gas giants to tiny rocky bodies, exoplanets with orbital periods of several days and less challenge theories of planet formation and evolution. Recent searches have found small rocky planets with orbits reaching almost down to their host stars’ surfaces, including an iron-rich Mars-sized body with an orbital period of only four hours. So close to their host stars that some of them are actively disintegrating, these objects’ origins remain unclear, and even formation models that allow significant migration have trouble accounting for their very short periods. Some are members of multi-planet system and may have been driven inward via secular excitation and tidal damping by their sibling planets. Others may be the fossil cores of former gas giants whose atmospheres were stripped by tides.

In this presentation, I’ll discuss the work of our Short-Period Planets Group (SuPerPiG), focused on finding and understanding this surprising new class of exoplanets. We are sifting data from the reincarnated Kepler Mission, K2, to search for additional short-period planets and have found several new candidates. We are also modeling the tidal decay and disruption of close-in gaseous planets to determine how we could identify their remnants, and preliminary results suggest the cores have a distinctive mass-period relationship that may be apparent in the observed population. Whatever their origins, short-period planets are particularly amenable to discovery and detailed follow-up by ongoing and future surveys, including the TESS mission.

Tombaugh Observatory Open House
Dec 4 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory

Open to the public.

Faculty member: James Murphy

Graduate Students: Jacob Vander Vliet, Kyle Uckert

 

 

Jan
24
Wed
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Laurel Farris
Jan 24 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Laurel Farris @ Science Hall, Room 110

Characterizing the oscillatory response of the chromosphere during solar flares

Laurel Farris; NMSU Astronomy Department

Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) are observed in the emission of solar flares over a wide range of wavelengths,

particularly in the radio and hard x-ray regimes where non-thermal emission dominates. These pulsations are

considered to be an intrinsic feature of flares, yet the exact mechanism that triggers them remains unclear.

There have been reports of an increase in the oscillatory power at 3-minute periods (the local acoustic

cutoff frequency) in the solar chromosphere associated with flaring events. I propose to investigate the

chromospheric response to flares by inspecting the spatial and temporal onset and evolution of the 3-minute

oscillatory power, along with any QPP patterns that may appear in chromospheric emission. The analysis

will be extended to multiple flares, and will include time before, during, and after the main event. To test

initial methods, the target of interest was the well-studied 2011 February 15 X-class flare. Data from two

instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used in the preliminary study, including

continuum images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and UV images at 1600 and 1700

Angstroms from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Later, spectroscopic data from the Interface

Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) will be used to examine velocity patterns in addition to intensity.

Jan
26
Fri
Colloquium: Zheng Cai (Host: Kristian Finlator)
Jan 26 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Zheng Cai (Host: Kristian Finlator) @ BX102

Colloquium Title

Colloquium Speaker Name, Affiliation

Abstract text

Feb
5
Mon
PDS Atmospheres Node meeting
Feb 5 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm