Calendar

Oct
30
Fri
Colloquium: Sergio Rodriguez
Oct 30 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Sergio Rodriguez @ BX102

BOSS DR12 survey: Clustering of galaxies and Dark Matter Haloes

Sergio Rodriguez, UAM, Madrid and Cal. Berkeley

BOSS SDSS-III is the largest redshift survey for the large scale structure and a powerful sample for the study of the low redshift Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations. We combine the features of the survey, such as, geometry, angular incompleteness and stellar mass incompleteness, with the BigMultiDark cosmological simulation to do a study of the distribution of galaxies in the dark matter halos. Using this large N-Body simulation and the halo abundance matching technique, we found a remarkably good agreement with the 2-point and 3-point statistics of the data.

Mar
4
Fri
Colloquium: Gail Zasowski (Host: Drew Chojnowski)
Mar 4 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Gail Zasowski  (Host: Drew Chojnowski) @ BX102

New Tools for Galactic Archaeology from the Milky Way

Gail Zasowski, John Hopkins University

One of the critical components for understanding galaxy evolution is understanding the Milky Way Galaxy itself — its detailed structure and chemodynamical properties, as well as fundamental stellar physics, which we can only study in great detail locally.  This field is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion towards the kinds of large-scale statistical analyses long used by the extragalactic and other communities, thanks in part to an enormous influx of data from space- and ground-based surveys.  I will describe the Milky Way and Local Group in the context of general galaxy evolution and highlight some recent developments in Galactic astrophysics that take advantage of these big data sets and analysis techniques.  In particular, I will focus on two diverse approaches: one to characterize the distribution and dynamics of the carbon-rich, dusty diffuse ISM, and one to map the resolved bulk stellar properties of the inner disk and bulge.  The rapid progress in these areas promises to continue, with the arrival of data sets from missions like SDSS, Gaia, LSST, and WFIRST.

May
31
Tue
Colloquium PhD Defense: Diane Feuillet
May 31 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Colloquium PhD Defense: Diane Feuillet @ Dominici106

Ages and Abundance of Local Stellar Populations

Diane Feuillet, NMSU

Oct
17
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Caitlin Doughty
Oct 17 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Caitlin Doughty @ AY 119

Title: Probing the z~6 UVB with Aligned Metal Absorbers

Caitlin Doughty

 

Jan
30
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Caitlin Doughty
Jan 30 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Caitlin Doughty @ AY 119

Title: Effect of molecular gas on simulated C II, C IV absorber fractions (598 Talk)

Caitlin Doughty

 

Apr
7
Fri
Colloquium: Lauren Waszek (Host: Jason Jackiewicz)
Apr 7 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Lauren Waszek (Host: Jason Jackiewicz) @ BX102

The growth of Earth’s inner core: a new technique to constrain seismic properties in its outermost layers

Dr. Lauren Waszek, Department of Physics, NMSU

The inner core displays a hemispherical difference in seismic velocity, attenuation, and anisotropy, which is well-established from seismic studies. Recent observations reveal increasingly complex and regional features. However, geodynamical models generally only attempt to explain the basic east-west asymmetry. Regional seismic features, such as depth-dependence anisotropy or variation in hemisphere boundaries, are difficult to reproduce and relatively poorly constrained by seismic data. Processes to generate these complex features are debated.

The structures of the inner core are suggested to be formed as the inner core grows over time. Thus, the most recently-formed outermost layers likely hold the key to understanding the geodynamical mechanisms generating the inner core properties. Current datasets of the uppermost inner core and inner core boundary are limited by uneven data coverage, however. In the very uppermost inner core, seismic waves arrive with similar travel times and interfere, making measurements difficult.

Despite the uneven coverage of current datasets, we can use them to infer a very slow inner core super-rotation. The first ever global tomographical inversion for the inner core allows us to make regional observations, and map the lateral variation in the hemispherical structures. In the uppermost inner core, we have developed a new waveform modeling technique with synthetic data to separate these seismic phases, allowing us to measure the seismic properties in the very uppermost inner core. This, in combination with geodynamical modeling, will help us determine how the inner core hemispheres and other features are generated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oct
16
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Ken Naiff
Oct 16 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Ken Naiff @ AY 119

Dark Sky Images

Ken Naiff

Ken, an retired engineer, is a highly technically skilled and artistic
astrophotographer.  He will be sharing some of his work and elaborating on
the technical methods and processing techniques he applies to obtain his
unique and enhanced images.  You can see Ken’s work at:

https://darkskyimagesbyken.com/products

 

Dec
4
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Karen Kinemuchi
Dec 4 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Karen Kinemuchi @ AY 119

Life at Apache Point Observatory