Calendar

Sep
28
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Ethan Dederick
Sep 28 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Ethan Dederick

Mars One: Current State & Future Plans

Jan
22
Fri
Colloquium: Rich Zurek (Host: Jim Murphy)
Jan 22 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Rich Zurek        (Host: Jim Murphy) @ BX102

Evolving Perspectives on the Atmosphere and Climate of Mars

            Dr. Richard Zurek, JPL

            Abstract: The planet Mars has both fascinated and tantalized humankind since the invention of the telescope and now well into the age of exploration from space. The first of three waves of space missions to Mars were flyby spacecraft that returned images of a heavily cratered planet with a thin atmosphere, suggesting Mars was more like the Moon than an older Earth. However, Mariner 9, the first spacecraft to orbit another planet, found vast channel and valley networks carved into its surface, as well as towering volcanoes, suggesting that ancient Mars was once much more Earth-like. Subsequent missions have landed on the planet and new orbiters have probed the planet at ever increasing spatial resolution and spectral coverage. As a result of the latest round of space exploration, Mars is revealed to be a complex, diverse planet— one whose climate has changed dramatically over time from an ancient atmosphere where water was active on its surface to a drier, thinner atmosphere shaped by periodic ice ages, to the present atmosphere where dynamic change continues today.

Dr. Zurek is the Chief Scientist in the Mars Program Office, Project Scientist, MRO.

Jan
29
Fri
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Kathryn Steakley (Host: Jim Murphy)
Jan 29 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal:  Kathryn Steakley  (Host: Jim Murphy) @ BX102

Exploring Impact Heating of the Early Martian Climate

Kathryn Steakley, NMSU

ABSTRACT: Geological evidence implies that Mars may have had a more warm and wet environment during the late Noachian / early Hesperian era (3.5–3.8 billion years ago), but climate models struggle to reproduce such warm conditions. Prior studies with one-dimensional atmospheric models indicate that the water and energy from impacts could provide enough greenhouse warming to raise temperatures above the freezing point of liquid water for many years. We will use the NASA Ames Research Center Mars GCM to characterize potential atmospheric changes induced by impactors ranging in diameter from 50 m to 100 km on a range of early Mars surface pressure scenarios (10-mbar, 100-mbar, 300-mbar, 1-bar, 2-bar, 3-bar). Our objectives are 1) to examine the temperature behavior of the early Martian climate following impacts and determine if environmental conditions on its surface could support liquid water for extended periods of time, and 2) to quantify precipitation rates and examine rainfall patterns on a simulated early Martian surface following impacts and determine if this mechanism is possibly responsible for the formation of observed river valley networks on Mars. Examining climate conditions after impacts with a GCM will allow us to test a potential mechanism for heating the early Martian atmosphere, constrain the magnitude and temporal duration of these potential heating events, and provide insight regarding the availability of liquid water on early Mars which is relevant to its past habitability.

 

Oct
16
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Ken Naiff
Oct 16 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Ken Naiff @ AY 119

Dark Sky Images

Ken Naiff

Ken, an retired engineer, is a highly technically skilled and artistic
astrophotographer.  He will be sharing some of his work and elaborating on
the technical methods and processing techniques he applies to obtain his
unique and enhanced images.  You can see Ken’s work at:

https://darkskyimagesbyken.com/products