Calendar

Dec
4
Fri
Colloquium: Brian Jackson
Dec 4 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Brian Jackson @ BX102

On the Edge: Exoplanets with Orbital Periods Shorter Than a Peter Jackson Movie

Brian Jackson, Boise State Univeristy

From wispy gas giants to tiny rocky bodies, exoplanets with orbital periods of several days and less challenge theories of planet formation and evolution. Recent searches have found small rocky planets with orbits reaching almost down to their host stars’ surfaces, including an iron-rich Mars-sized body with an orbital period of only four hours. So close to their host stars that some of them are actively disintegrating, these objects’ origins remain unclear, and even formation models that allow significant migration have trouble accounting for their very short periods. Some are members of multi-planet system and may have been driven inward via secular excitation and tidal damping by their sibling planets. Others may be the fossil cores of former gas giants whose atmospheres were stripped by tides.

In this presentation, I’ll discuss the work of our Short-Period Planets Group (SuPerPiG), focused on finding and understanding this surprising new class of exoplanets. We are sifting data from the reincarnated Kepler Mission, K2, to search for additional short-period planets and have found several new candidates. We are also modeling the tidal decay and disruption of close-in gaseous planets to determine how we could identify their remnants, and preliminary results suggest the cores have a distinctive mass-period relationship that may be apparent in the observed population. Whatever their origins, short-period planets are particularly amenable to discovery and detailed follow-up by ongoing and future surveys, including the TESS mission.

Apr
15
Fri
Colloquium: Warren Skidmore (Host: Jim Murphy)
Apr 15 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Warren Skidmore     (Host: Jim Murphy) @ BX102

The Thirty Meter Telescope:   The Next Generation Ground Based Optical/InfraRed Observatory

Dr. Warren Skidmore, Thirty Meter Telescope Corp.

 

Abstract: After a construction status update, I will describe how the telescope design was developed to support a broad range of observing capabilities and how the observatory is being engineered. I’ll discuss some of the observational capabilities that the Thirty Meter Telescope will provide and some of the areas of study that will benefit from the TMT’s capabilities, specifically synergistic areas with new and future proposed astronomical facilities. Finally I will describe the avenues through which astronomers can have some input in the planning of the project and potential NSF partnership, prioritizing the development of 2nd generation instruments and directing the scientific aims for the observatory.

Sep
20
Tue
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Ethan Dederick
Sep 20 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Ethan Dederick @ Science Hall 310

Utilizing Planetary Oscillations to Constrain the Interior Structure of the Jovian Planets

Ethan Dederick

Seismology has been the premier tool of study for understanding the
interior structure of the Earth, the Sun, and even other stars. Yet in this
thesis proposal, we wish to utilize these tools to understand the interior
structure of the Jovian planets, Saturn in particular. Recent observations
of spiral density structures in Saturn’s rings caused by its oscillations
have provided insight into which modes exist within Saturn and at what
frequencies. Utilizing these frequencies to compare to probable mode can-
didates calculated from Saturn models will also us to ascertain the interior
profiles of state variables such as density, sound speed, rotation, etc. Using
these profiles in a Saturn model, coupled with tweaking the interior struc-
ture of the model, i.e. the inclusion of stably stratified regions, should
allow us to explain which modes are responsible for the density structures
in the rings, as well as predict where to look to find more such structures.
In doing so, we will not only have a much greater understanding of Sat-
urn’s interior structure, but will have constructed a method that can also
be applied to Jupiter once observations of its mode frequencies become
available. In addition, we seek to explain if moist convection on Jupiter is
responsible for exciting its modes. We aim to do this by modeling Jupiter
as a 2D harmonic oscillator. By creating a resonance between moist con-
vective storms and Jovian modes, we hope to match the expected mode
energies and surface displacements of Jupiter’s oscillations.

Oct
16
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Ken Naiff
Oct 16 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Ken Naiff @ AY 119

Dark Sky Images

Ken Naiff

Ken, an retired engineer, is a highly technically skilled and artistic
astrophotographer.  He will be sharing some of his work and elaborating on
the technical methods and processing techniques he applies to obtain his
unique and enhanced images.  You can see Ken’s work at:

https://darkskyimagesbyken.com/products

 

Jan
24
Wed
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Laurel Farris
Jan 24 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Colloquium Thesis Proposal: Laurel Farris @ Science Hall, Room 110

Characterizing the oscillatory response of the chromosphere during solar flares

Laurel Farris; NMSU Astronomy Department

Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) are observed in the emission of solar flares over a wide range of wavelengths,

particularly in the radio and hard x-ray regimes where non-thermal emission dominates. These pulsations are

considered to be an intrinsic feature of flares, yet the exact mechanism that triggers them remains unclear.

There have been reports of an increase in the oscillatory power at 3-minute periods (the local acoustic

cutoff frequency) in the solar chromosphere associated with flaring events. I propose to investigate the

chromospheric response to flares by inspecting the spatial and temporal onset and evolution of the 3-minute

oscillatory power, along with any QPP patterns that may appear in chromospheric emission. The analysis

will be extended to multiple flares, and will include time before, during, and after the main event. To test

initial methods, the target of interest was the well-studied 2011 February 15 X-class flare. Data from two

instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used in the preliminary study, including

continuum images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and UV images at 1600 and 1700

Angstroms from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Later, spectroscopic data from the Interface

Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) will be used to examine velocity patterns in addition to intensity.

Jan
26
Fri
Colloquium: Zheng Cai (Host: Kristian Finlator)
Jan 26 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Zheng Cai (Host: Kristian Finlator) @ BX102

Colloquium Title

Colloquium Speaker Name, Affiliation

Abstract text