Calendar

Oct
30
Fri
Colloquium: Sergio Rodriguez
Oct 30 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Sergio Rodriguez @ BX102

BOSS DR12 survey: Clustering of galaxies and Dark Matter Haloes

Sergio Rodriguez, UAM, Madrid and Cal. Berkeley

BOSS SDSS-III is the largest redshift survey for the large scale structure and a powerful sample for the study of the low redshift Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations. We combine the features of the survey, such as, geometry, angular incompleteness and stellar mass incompleteness, with the BigMultiDark cosmological simulation to do a study of the distribution of galaxies in the dark matter halos. Using this large N-Body simulation and the halo abundance matching technique, we found a remarkably good agreement with the 2-point and 3-point statistics of the data.

Feb
5
Fri
Colloquium: Steve Finkelstein (Host: Kristian Finlator)
Feb 5 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Steve Finkelstein   (Host: Kristian Finlator) @ BX102

Galaxy Evolution during the Epoch of Reionization

 Steve Finkelstein,  University of Texas at Austin

 

                       Abstract: The advent of the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope has heralded a new era in our ability to study the earliest phases of galaxy formation and evolution.  The number of candidates for galaxies now known at redshifts greater than six has grown to be in the thousands.  This allows us to move beyond mere counting of galaxies, to endeavor to understand the detailed physics regulating the growth of galaxies.  I will review the recent progress our group in Texas has made in this arena using the exquisite datasets from the CANDELS and Frontier Fields programs.  Specifically, our detailed new measurements of both the evolution of the stellar mass function and rest-frame UV luminosity function now allow us to probe the effect of feedback on low-mass galaxies, the star-formation efficiency in high-mass galaxies, and the contribution of galaxies to the reionization of the universe.  Our most recent result comes from the Frontier Fields, where we have used an advanced technique to remove the light from the cluster galaxies to uncover z > 6 galaxies as faint as M_UV=-13.  Our updated luminosity functions show no sign of a turnover down to these extremely faint levels, providing the first empirical test of reionization models which require such faint galaxies, and is in modest tension with simulations which predict a turnover at brighter levels.   I will also discuss our spectroscopic followup efforts, which have yielded two of the four highest redshift confirmed galaxies, and also provide further insight into reionization, by the scattering of Lyman alpha emission by neutral gas in the intergalactic medium.  I will conclude with a look ahead to the problems we can expect to tackle with ALMA, JWST, and even more future facilities.

Mar
4
Fri
Colloquium: Gail Zasowski (Host: Drew Chojnowski)
Mar 4 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Gail Zasowski  (Host: Drew Chojnowski) @ BX102

New Tools for Galactic Archaeology from the Milky Way

Gail Zasowski, John Hopkins University

One of the critical components for understanding galaxy evolution is understanding the Milky Way Galaxy itself — its detailed structure and chemodynamical properties, as well as fundamental stellar physics, which we can only study in great detail locally.  This field is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion towards the kinds of large-scale statistical analyses long used by the extragalactic and other communities, thanks in part to an enormous influx of data from space- and ground-based surveys.  I will describe the Milky Way and Local Group in the context of general galaxy evolution and highlight some recent developments in Galactic astrophysics that take advantage of these big data sets and analysis techniques.  In particular, I will focus on two diverse approaches: one to characterize the distribution and dynamics of the carbon-rich, dusty diffuse ISM, and one to map the resolved bulk stellar properties of the inner disk and bulge.  The rapid progress in these areas promises to continue, with the arrival of data sets from missions like SDSS, Gaia, LSST, and WFIRST.

May
31
Tue
Colloquium PhD Defense: Diane Feuillet
May 31 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Colloquium PhD Defense: Diane Feuillet @ Dominici106

Ages and Abundance of Local Stellar Populations

Diane Feuillet, NMSU

Oct
28
Fri
Colloquium: Mark Wardle
Oct 28 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Mark Wardle @ Biology Annex 102

Star formation in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Centre

Dr. Mark Wardle, Macquarie University

The disruptive tidal field near supermassive black holes overcomes the self-gravity of objects that are less dense than the Roche density.  This was once expected to suppress star formation within several parsecs of  Sgr A*, the four million solar mass black hole at the centre of the Galaxy.   It has since become apparent that things are not this simple:  Sgr A* is surrounded by a sub-parsec-scale orbiting disk of massive stars, indicating a star formation event occurred a few million years ago.    And on parsec scales,  star formation seems to be happening now:  there are proplyd candidates and protostellar outflow candidates,  as well as methanol and water masers that in the galactic disk would be regarded as sure-fire signatures of star formation.  In this talk, I shall consider how star formation can occur so close to Sgr A*.

The stellar disk may be created through the partial capture of a molecular cloud as it swept through the inner few parsecs of the galaxy and temporarily engulfed Sgr A*.  This rather naturally creates a disk of gas with the steep surface density profile of the present stellar disk.  The inner 0.04 pc  is so optically thick that it cannot fragment, instead accreting onto Sgr A* in a few million years; meanwhile the outer disk fragments and creates the observed stellar disk.   The isolated young stellar objects found at larger distances, on the other hand,  can be explained by stabilisation of clouds or cloud cores by the high external pressure that permeates the inner Galaxy.   A virial analysis shows that clouds are indeed tidally disrupted within 0.5 pc of Sgr A*, but outside this the external pressure allows self-gravitating clouds to survive, providing the raw material for ongoing star formation.

 

Dec
4
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Karen Kinemuchi
Dec 4 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Karen Kinemuchi @ AY 119

Life at Apache Point Observatory