Calendar

Nov
20
Fri
Tombaugh Observatory Open House
Nov 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory

Open to the public.

Faculty member: James McAteer

Graduate Students: Nigel Mathes, Emma Dahl, Laura Mayorga

 

 

Dec
4
Fri
Colloquium: Brian Jackson
Dec 4 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Brian Jackson @ BX102

On the Edge: Exoplanets with Orbital Periods Shorter Than a Peter Jackson Movie

Brian Jackson, Boise State Univeristy

From wispy gas giants to tiny rocky bodies, exoplanets with orbital periods of several days and less challenge theories of planet formation and evolution. Recent searches have found small rocky planets with orbits reaching almost down to their host stars’ surfaces, including an iron-rich Mars-sized body with an orbital period of only four hours. So close to their host stars that some of them are actively disintegrating, these objects’ origins remain unclear, and even formation models that allow significant migration have trouble accounting for their very short periods. Some are members of multi-planet system and may have been driven inward via secular excitation and tidal damping by their sibling planets. Others may be the fossil cores of former gas giants whose atmospheres were stripped by tides.

In this presentation, I’ll discuss the work of our Short-Period Planets Group (SuPerPiG), focused on finding and understanding this surprising new class of exoplanets. We are sifting data from the reincarnated Kepler Mission, K2, to search for additional short-period planets and have found several new candidates. We are also modeling the tidal decay and disruption of close-in gaseous planets to determine how we could identify their remnants, and preliminary results suggest the cores have a distinctive mass-period relationship that may be apparent in the observed population. Whatever their origins, short-period planets are particularly amenable to discovery and detailed follow-up by ongoing and future surveys, including the TESS mission.

Tombaugh Observatory Open House
Dec 4 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory

Open to the public.

Faculty member: James Murphy

Graduate Students: Jacob Vander Vliet, Kyle Uckert

 

 

Jan
22
Fri
Tombaugh Observatory Open House
Jan 22 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory | Las Cruces | New Mexico | United States

Open to the public.

Faculty member: Rene Walterbos

Graduate Students: Kenza Arraki, Drew Chojnowski, Diane Feuillet

 

 

Feb
12
Fri
Tombaugh Observatory Open House
Feb 12 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory | Las Cruces | New Mexico | United States

Open to the public.

Faculty member: Jason Jackiewicz

Graduate Students: Xander Thelen, Caitlin Doughty, Agnar Hall

 

 

Mar
11
Fri
Tombaugh Observatory Open House
Mar 11 @ 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory | Las Cruces | New Mexico | United States

Open to the public.

Faculty member: Moire Prescott

Graduate Students: Jeremy Emmett, Gavin Mathes, Gordon MacDonald

 

 

Apr
15
Fri
Tombaugh Observatory Open House
Apr 15 @ 9:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory | Las Cruces | New Mexico | United States

Open to the public.

Faculty member: Chris Churchill

Graduate Students: Carlos Vargas, Sam Schonfeld, Jean McKeever

 

May
13
Fri
Tombaugh Observatory Open House
May 13 @ 9:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory | Las Cruces | New Mexico | United States

Open to the public.

Faculty member: Nancy Chanover

Graduate Students: Jacob VanderVliet, Ethan Dederick, Jean McKeever

 

Sep
9
Fri
Tombaugh Observatory Open House
Sep 9 @ 9:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Tombaugh Observatory Open House @ Tombaugh Observatory | Las Cruces | New Mexico | United States

The NMSU Department of Astronomy will hold an observatory open house at the NMSU campus observatory at 8 p.m.Friday, Sept. 9. Astronomy personnel on hand will be Chris Churchill and graduate assistants Xander Thelen, Trevor Picard and Jacob Vander Vliet.

Guests can view Mars and Saturn together in the evening sky in the constellation of Scorpio. Telescopes will also have the center of the Milky Way Galaxy in view, and in this region there are many beautiful star clusters and globular clusters (tight groups of millions of stars). High in the sky, viewers will see the constellation Vega with its double-double star system and the famous ring nebula, which is the remnants of a dying star much like our own sun. The moon will be in the phase called first quarter and will make a wonderful sight.

Contact the NMSU Astronomy Department at 575-646-4438 with questions. Everyone is welcome to come and spend an evening of stargazing. Admission is free and children are especially welcome to attend.

For information on what is up in September, go here: http://whatsouttonight.com/Resources/2016SepSkyWOT.pdf

Oct
16
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Ken Naiff
Oct 16 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Ken Naiff @ AY 119

Dark Sky Images

Ken Naiff

Ken, an retired engineer, is a highly technically skilled and artistic
astrophotographer.  He will be sharing some of his work and elaborating on
the technical methods and processing techniques he applies to obtain his
unique and enhanced images.  You can see Ken’s work at:

https://darkskyimagesbyken.com/products