Calendar

Mar
31
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Mar 31 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Apr
7
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Apr 7 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Apr
14
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Apr 14 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Apr
21
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Apr 21 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Apr
28
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Apr 28 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
May
5
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
May 5 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Oct
10
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Laura Mayorga
Oct 10 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Laura Mayorga @ AY 119

Title: Proto-BD disks and the Kavli Summer Program in Astrophysics

Laura Mayorga

 

Nov
18
Fri
Colloquium: Karen Olsen
Nov 18 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Karen Olsen @ Biology Annex 102

Simulations of the interstellar medium at high redshift: What does [CII] trace?

Dr. Karen Olsen, Arizona State University

We are in an exciting era were simulations on large, cosmological scales meet modeling of the interstellar medium (ISM) on sub-parsec scales. This gives us a way to predict and interpret observations of the ISM, and in particular the star-forming gas, in high-redshift galaxies, useful for ongoing and future ALMA/VLA projects.

In this talk, I will walk you though the current state of simulations targeting the the fine structure line of [CII] at 158 microns, which has now been observed in several z>6 galaxies. [CII] can arise throughout the interstellar medium (ISM), but the brightness of the [CII] line depends strongly on local environment within a galaxy, meaning that the ISM phase dominating the [CII] emission can depend on galaxy type. This complicates the use of [CII] as a tracer of either SFR or ISM mass and calls for detailed modeling following the different ways in which [CII] can be excited.

I will present SÍGAME (Simulator of GAlaxy Millimeter/submillimeter emission) – a novel method for predicting the origin and strength of line emission from galaxies. Our method combines data from cosmological simulations with sub-grid physics that carefully calculates local radiation field strength, pressure, and ionizational/thermal balance. Preliminary results will be shown from recent modeling of [CII] emission from z~6 star-forming galaxies with SÍGAME. We find strong potential for using the total [CII] luminosity to derive the ISM and molecular gas mass of galaxies during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR).

 

Jun
27
Tue
Colloquium PhD Defense: Laura Mayorga
Jun 27 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Colloquium PhD Defense: Laura Mayorga @ Domenici Hall 102

The Orbital and Planetary Phase Variations of Jupiter-Sized Planets: Characterizing Present and Future Giants

Laura Mayorga, NMSU

It is commonly said that exoplanet science is 100 years behind planetary science. While we may be able to travel to an exoplanet in the future, inferring the properties of exoplanets currently relies on extracting as much information as possible from a limited dataset. In order to further our ability to characterize, classify, and understand exoplanets as both a population and as individuals, this thesis makes use of multiple types of observations and simulations.

Firstly, direct-imaging is a technique long used in planetary science and is only now becoming feasible for exoplanet characterization. We present our results from analyzing Jupiter’s phase curve with Cassini/ISS to instruct the community in the complexity of exoplanet atmospheres and the need for further model development. The planet yields from future missions may be overestimated by today’s models. We also discuss the need for optimal bandpasses to best differentiate between planet classes.

Secondly, photometric surveys are still the best way of conducting population surveys of exoplanets. In particular, the Kepler dataset remains one of the highest precision photometric datasets and many planetary candidates remain to be characterized. We present techniques by which more information, such as a planet’s mass, can be extracted from a transit light curve without expensive ground- or space-based follow-up observations.

Finally, radial-velocity observations have revealed that many of the larger “planets” may actually be brown dwarfs. To understand the distinction between a brown dwarf and an exoplanet or a star, we have developed a simple, semi-analytic viscous disk model to study brown dwarf evolutionary history. We present the rudimentary framework and discuss its performance compared to more detailed numerical simulations as well as how additional physics and development can determine the potential observational characteristics that will differentiate between various formation scenarios.

Exoplanet science has already uncovered a plethora of previously unconsidered phenomenon. To increase our understanding of our own planet, as well as the other various possible end cases, will require a closer inspection of our own solar system, the nuanced details of exoplanet data, refined simulations, and laboratory astrophysics.

Sep
8
Fri
Colloquium: Travis Metcalfe (Host: Jason Jackiewicz)
Sep 8 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Travis Metcalfe (Host: Jason Jackiewicz) @ BX102

The Magnetic Mid-life Crisis of the Sun

Dr. Travis Metcalfe, Space Sciences Institute

After decades of effort, the solar activity cycle is exceptionally well characterized but it remains poorly understood. Pioneering work at the Mount Wilson Observatory demonstrated that other sun-like stars also show regular activity cycles, and suggested two possible relationships between the rotation rate and the length of the cycle. Neither of these relationships correctly describe the properties of the Sun, a peculiarity that demands explanation. Recent discoveries have started to shed light on this issue, suggesting that the Sun’s rotation rate and magnetic field are currently in a transitional phase that occurs in all middle-aged stars. We have recently identified the manifestation of this magnetic transition in the best available data on stellar cycles. The results suggest that the solar cycle may be growing longer on stellar evolutionary timescales, and that the cycle might disappear sometime in the next 0.8-2.4 Gyr. Future tests of this hypothesis will come from ground-based activity monitoring of Kepler targets that span the magnetic transition, and from asteroseismology with the TESS mission to determine precise masses and ages for bright stars with known cycles.