Calendar

Oct
9
Fri
Colloquium: Ben Weiner
Oct 9 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Ben Weiner @ BX102

Searching for Dwarf Satellites around Milky Way – Analog Galaxies with the SAGA survey

Ben Weiner, Steward Observatory

Dwarf satellites of massive galaxies are a probe of many issues in galaxy evolution and cosmology, including the nature of low-mass galaxies, star formation at early times, accretion into halos, and the abundance of low-mass dark matter halos. Much attention has been devoted to the number and nature of Milky Way and M31 dwarf satellites, especially the “missing satellites problem.” However, we know very little about dwarf satellites outside the Local Group below the mass of the LMC, and we don’t know if the MW and M31 satellite systems are typical. The SAGA (Satellites Around Galactic Analogs) survey collaboration aims to address this with both observational and theoretical studies of satellite abundances and properties around Milky Way analog central galaxies. I will present results from our MMT/Hectospec wide field spectroscopic surveys for satellites. We have surveyed the fields of several nearby galaxies that are similar to the Milky Way to detect and spectroscopically confirm dwarf satellites.  We find a range of numbers of satellites, suggesting that there is a significant variance in halo histories.  We also find that not all dwarf systems resemble the Milky Way and M31 systems. I will discuss these results and some of the implications on the life cycle of satellites that we can infer from satellite abundances and properties, including their images and spectra.

 

Apr
1
Fri
Colloquium: Hwiyun Kim (Host: Rene Walterbos)
Apr 1 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Hwiyun Kim     (Host: Rene Walterbos) @ BX102

High Resolution Spectroscopy with Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS)

Hwihyun Kim, KASI/UT Austin

 

The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a revolutionary instrument that exploits broad spectral coverage at high-resolution (R=45,000) in the near-infrared. IGRINS employs a silicon immersion grating as the primary disperser of the white pupil, and volume-phase holographic gratings cross-disperse the H and K bands onto Teledyne Hawaii-2RG arrays. IGRINS provides simultaneous wavelength coverage from 1.45 – 2.45 microns in a compact cryostat. I will summarize the performance and various science programs of IGRINS since commissioning in Summer 2014. With IGRINS we have observed such as Solar System objects, nearby young stars, star-forming regions like Taurus and Ophiuchus, the Galactic Center, and planetary nebulae.

The second half of my talk will be focused on the study of ionized and neutral gas in an ultracompact HII region Monoceros R2. We obtained the IGRINS spectra of Mon R2 to study the kinematic patterns in the areas where ionized and molecular gases interact. The position-velocity maps from the IGRINS spectra demonstrate that the ionized gases (Brackett and Pfund series, He and Fe emission lines;Δv ≈ 40km/s) flow along the walls of the surrounding clouds. This is consistent with the model by Zhu et al. (2005, 2008). In the PV maps of the H2 emission lines there is no obvious motion (Δv < ~10km/s) of the molecular hydrogen right at the ionization boundary. This implies that the molecular gas is not taking part in the flow as the ionized gas is moving along the cavity walls.

Sep
19
Mon
Pizza Lunch: Reta Beebe
Sep 19 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Pizza Lunch: Reta Beebe @ AY 119

Title: JUNO

Reta Beebe

A .pdf of the talk can be found here.