Calendar

Mar
23
Wed
J. Paul Taylor Social Justice Symposium
Mar 23 @ 8:00 am – 8:00 pm

The Inclusive Astronomy group would like to encourage members of the department to attend the 12th J. Paul Taylor Social Justice Symposium on Social Justice for LGBTQ* Identities in the Borderland. The astronomy department is a sponsor of this event.

“Key themes of this year’s symposium include: 1) The experiences/specific precarity of undocumented LGBTQ immigrants in the region; 2) The plight of transgender people in detention centers in the region; 3) The connections between sexuality, gender, citizenship, and immigration; and 4) LGBTQ* lives, activism, and experiences in the Borderlands region.”

Mar
24
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Mar 24 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Mar
31
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Mar 31 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Apr
7
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Apr 7 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Apr
14
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Apr 14 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Apr
15
Fri
Colloquium: Warren Skidmore (Host: Jim Murphy)
Apr 15 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Warren Skidmore     (Host: Jim Murphy) @ BX102

The Thirty Meter Telescope:   The Next Generation Ground Based Optical/InfraRed Observatory

Dr. Warren Skidmore, Thirty Meter Telescope Corp.

 

Abstract: After a construction status update, I will describe how the telescope design was developed to support a broad range of observing capabilities and how the observatory is being engineered. I’ll discuss some of the observational capabilities that the Thirty Meter Telescope will provide and some of the areas of study that will benefit from the TMT’s capabilities, specifically synergistic areas with new and future proposed astronomical facilities. Finally I will describe the avenues through which astronomers can have some input in the planning of the project and potential NSF partnership, prioritizing the development of 2nd generation instruments and directing the scientific aims for the observatory.

Apr
21
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Apr 21 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Apr
28
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
Apr 28 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
May
5
Thu
Inclusive Astronomy Group
May 5 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

We will explore ways to make astronomy, and STEM fields in general, a more inclusive and welcoming environment where EVERYONE can feel comfortable. This will make all people, including traditionally underrepresented groups, feel comfortable and welcomed working in our field.

One of the main goals this semester will be to identify and implement ways in which our own department can easily become more inclusive and welcoming. Come join us to find out what you can do!
Visit our webpage for more information about what we have been doing.
Mar
28
Tue
Joint Physics/Astronomy Colloquium: William Newman
Mar 28 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Joint Physics/Astronomy Colloquium: William Newman @ Gardiner Hall 229, Physics. Dept. | Ames | Iowa | United States

Giant Planet Shielding of the Inner Solar System Revisited: Blending Celestial Mechanics with Advanced Computation

Dr. William Newman, UCLA

The Earth has sustained during the last billion years as many as five catastrophic collisions with asteroids and comets which led to widespread species extinctions. Our own atmosphere was literally blown away 4.5 billion years ago by a collision with a Mars-sized impactor. However, collisions with comets originating in the outer solar system accreted much of the present-day atmosphere. Relatively advanced life on our planet is the beneficiary of a number of impact events during Earth’s history which built our atmosphere without destroying a large fraction of terrestrial life. Using very high precision Monte Carlo integration methods to explore the orbital evolution over hundreds of millions of years followed by the application of celestial mechanical techniques, the presentation will explain directly how Earth was shielded by the combined influence of Jupiter and Saturn, assuring that only 1 in 100,000 potential collisions with the Earth will materialize.