Calendar

Apr
15
Fri
Colloquium: Warren Skidmore (Host: Jim Murphy)
Apr 15 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium:  Warren Skidmore     (Host: Jim Murphy) @ BX102

The Thirty Meter Telescope:   The Next Generation Ground Based Optical/InfraRed Observatory

Dr. Warren Skidmore, Thirty Meter Telescope Corp.

 

Abstract: After a construction status update, I will describe how the telescope design was developed to support a broad range of observing capabilities and how the observatory is being engineered. I’ll discuss some of the observational capabilities that the Thirty Meter Telescope will provide and some of the areas of study that will benefit from the TMT’s capabilities, specifically synergistic areas with new and future proposed astronomical facilities. Finally I will describe the avenues through which astronomers can have some input in the planning of the project and potential NSF partnership, prioritizing the development of 2nd generation instruments and directing the scientific aims for the observatory.

Feb
24
Fri
Colloquium: Thomas Rivinius
Feb 24 @ 3:15 pm – 4:15 pm
Colloquium: Thomas Rivinius

Our Current Understanding of Classical Be Stars

Dr. Thomas Rivinius, Chile, ESO Paranal

I will introduce Be stars as B-type stars with gaseous disks in Keplerian rotation. These disks form by mass ejection from the star itself and their evolution is then governed by viscosity. The observables and their formation in the disk will be discussed, as well as what we know about the central stars: they are the most rapidly rotating non-degenerate stars, they are non-radial pulsators, and they do not show magnetic fields. The pulsation is clearly (phenomenologically) linked to the mass ejection, but the physical mechanism responsible for the ejection and disk formation is not known. Finally, I will discuss several open questions of broader interest, including the (possibly absent) chemical mixing of very rapid rotators and the unexpectedly large viscosity of Be star disks.

 

Mar
28
Tue
Joint Physics/Astronomy Colloquium: William Newman
Mar 28 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Joint Physics/Astronomy Colloquium: William Newman @ Gardiner Hall 229, Physics. Dept. | Ames | Iowa | United States

Giant Planet Shielding of the Inner Solar System Revisited: Blending Celestial Mechanics with Advanced Computation

Dr. William Newman, UCLA

The Earth has sustained during the last billion years as many as five catastrophic collisions with asteroids and comets which led to widespread species extinctions. Our own atmosphere was literally blown away 4.5 billion years ago by a collision with a Mars-sized impactor. However, collisions with comets originating in the outer solar system accreted much of the present-day atmosphere. Relatively advanced life on our planet is the beneficiary of a number of impact events during Earth’s history which built our atmosphere without destroying a large fraction of terrestrial life. Using very high precision Monte Carlo integration methods to explore the orbital evolution over hundreds of millions of years followed by the application of celestial mechanical techniques, the presentation will explain directly how Earth was shielded by the combined influence of Jupiter and Saturn, assuring that only 1 in 100,000 potential collisions with the Earth will materialize.